A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Outcomes in the Treatment of Aphasia An extensive search of aphasia-treatment literature yielded 55 reports of clinical outcomes satisfying the essential criteria for inclusion in a meta-analysis. The results confirmed those of an earlier meta-analysis in demonstrating the utility of aphasia treatments, generally considered, for bringing about desirable clinical outcomes. Beyond the general case, the new ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 1998
A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Outcomes in the Treatment of Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Randall R. Robey
    University of Virginia Charlottesville
  • Contact author: Randall R. Robey, PhD, Communication Disorders Program, University of Virginia, Suite 202, 2205 Fontaine Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22903
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 1998
A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Outcomes in the Treatment of Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 172-187. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.172
History: Received July 9, 1996 , Accepted June 6, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 172-187. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.172
History: Received July 9, 1996; Accepted June 6, 1997

An extensive search of aphasia-treatment literature yielded 55 reports of clinical outcomes satisfying the essential criteria for inclusion in a meta-analysis. The results confirmed those of an earlier meta-analysis in demonstrating the utility of aphasia treatments, generally considered, for bringing about desirable clinical outcomes. Beyond the general case, the new findings address clinical utility in finer detail than was previously possible. Effects of treatment for aphasia are synthesized and assessed for each of four important dimensions: amount of treatment, type of treatment, severity of aphasia, and type of aphasia.

Acknowledgments
The author thanks Drs. M. C. Schultz and R. J. Stoudt for their helpful comments regarding drafts of this manuscript; two manuscript reviewers and the associate editor for their helpful comments; and Florinda C. Chun, Amy B. Crawford, Amy P. Shirley, and Cheryl A. Sinner for their assistance throughout. Parts of this manuscript were presented before the faculties of Charles University and Motol University Hospital in Prague. Twenty years have elapsed since Dr. Bruce D. Olsen initiated the first in a series of events leading to this work. Let it, therefore, do honor to the memory of our colleague and my dear friend.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access