Adjustment to Hearing Impairment II Audiological and Demographic Correlates Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1998
Adjustment to Hearing Impairment II
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue Ann Erdman
    University of Maryland Baltimore County
  • Marilyn E. Demorest
    University of Maryland Baltimore County
  • Contact author: Sue Ann Erdman, Hearing Rehabilitation Laboratory, Department of Psychology, UMBC, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1998
Adjustment to Hearing Impairment II
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 123-136. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.123
History: Received February 12, 1997 , Accepted August 1, 1997
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1998, Vol. 41, 123-136. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4101.123
History: Received February 12, 1997; Accepted August 1, 1997

To study adjustment to hearing impairment, clinical records from a five-center consortium (N=1,008) were used to create a heterogeneous clinical database with results of audiometric tests, demographic and case history information, and responses to the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI; Demorest & Erdman, 1986, 1987). Normative findings have been described previously (Erdman & Demorest, 1998). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that audiometric variables were moderately correlated with communication performance, behavioral strategies, and personal adjustment. With hearing impairment controlled statistically, age and education effects were evident in many areas of adjustment; correlations between adjustment and gender were relatively weak; and marital status, employment status, and race/ethnicity were rarely significant correlates.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, R01DC01091. Computer resources were provided to the first author by the Virginia Public Education Network. The authors gratefully acknowledge the following collaborators and consultants for their contributions to this research: Miriam A. Henoch, Martyn L. Hyde, John F. Knutson, Charissa R. Lansing, Robert D. Madory, Joseph J. Montano, Margaret W. Skinner, David J. Wark, and P. Lee Wilson. We are also indebted to Joanna R. Bezek for her management of the clinical database, to Jennifer Basham for her assistance in the implementation of the clinical protocol at the Callier Center, and to Charissa R. Lansing for her constructive suggestions during preparation of the manuscript.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access