Long-Term Trajectories of the Development of Speech Sound Production in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients Purpose This study characterized the development of speech sound production in prelingually deaf children with a minimum of 8 years of cochlear implant (CI) experience. Method Twenty-seven pediatric CI recipients' spontaneous speech samples from annual evaluation sessions were phonemically transcribed. Accuracy for these speech samples was evaluated in ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   October 01, 2008
Long-Term Trajectories of the Development of Speech Sound Production in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Shu-Chen Peng
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Linda J. Spencer
    University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City
  • Nelson Lu
    Wyeth Research, Pearl River, NY
  • Contact author: Shu-Chen Peng, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. E-mail: speng@hesp.umd.edu.
Article Information
Development / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2008
Long-Term Trajectories of the Development of Speech Sound Production in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1353-1368. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0083)
History: Received April 15, 2007 , Accepted February 19, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1353-1368. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0083)
History: Received April 15, 2007; Accepted February 19, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Purpose This study characterized the development of speech sound production in prelingually deaf children with a minimum of 8 years of cochlear implant (CI) experience.

Method Twenty-seven pediatric CI recipients' spontaneous speech samples from annual evaluation sessions were phonemically transcribed. Accuracy for these speech samples was evaluated in piecewise regression models.

Results As a group, pediatric CI recipients showed steady improvement in speech sound production following implantation, but the improvement rate declined after 6 years of device experience. Piecewise regression models indicated that the slope estimating the participants' improvement rate was statistically greater than 0 during the first 6 years postimplantation, but not after 6 years. The group of pediatric CI recipients' accuracy of speech sound production after 4 years of device experience reasonably predicts their speech sound production after 5–10 years of device experience.

Conclusions The development of speech sound production in prelingually deaf children stabilizes after 6 years of device experience, and typically approaches a plateau by 8 years of device use. Early growth in speech before 4 years of device experience did not predict later rates of growth or levels of achievement. However, good predictions could be made after 4 years of device use.

Acknowledgments
Funding of this research was provided by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grant 2 P50 DC00242) and the General Clinical Research Centers Program of the National Institutes of Health (Grant RR00059). We appreciate the participation of all pediatric cochlear implant recipients and their families. We thank Sarah Knoll and Kara Zielinski for assisting in the transcription of speech samples (for reliability measurements). We acknowledge all constructive suggestions provided by Craig Champlin and Peggy Nelson.
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