Broadband Auditory Stream Segregation by Hearing-Impaired and Normal-Hearing Listeners Purpose To investigate the effects of hearing loss on auditory stream segregation of broadband inharmonic sounds. Method Auditory stream segregation by listeners with normal and impaired hearing was measured for 6-component inharmonic sounds (“A” and “B”) using objective and subjective methods. Components in the A stimuli ranged between ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2008
Broadband Auditory Stream Segregation by Hearing-Impaired and Normal-Hearing Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susie Valentine
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Jennifer J. Lentz
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Susie Valentine, who is now at Starkey Hearing Research Center, 2150 Shattuck Ave., Suite 408, Berkeley, CA 94704. E-mail: susie_valentine@starkey.com.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2008
Broadband Auditory Stream Segregation by Hearing-Impaired and Normal-Hearing Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1341-1352. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0193)
History: Received August 21, 2007 , Revised January 18, 2008 , Accepted February 11, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1341-1352. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0193)
History: Received August 21, 2007; Revised January 18, 2008; Accepted February 11, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose To investigate the effects of hearing loss on auditory stream segregation of broadband inharmonic sounds.

Method Auditory stream segregation by listeners with normal and impaired hearing was measured for 6-component inharmonic sounds (“A” and “B”) using objective and subjective methods. Components in the A stimuli ranged between 1000 and 4000 Hz, whereas B stimuli were generated at the same frequency ratio but scaled upward in frequency relative to the A stimuli. In Experiment 1, streaming was measured by having listeners detect a delay inserted into a sequence of A and B stimuli (A_B_A_B_…) for B stimuli with different frequencies. In Experiment 2, streaming was measured using an ABA_ABA_… sequence, and the frequency of the B stimulus decreased until listeners reported that they could “no longer hear two separate streams.”

Results Experiment 1 indicated no significant differences between groups in the size of the just detectable delay and no significant interactions between group and the scaling factor between the B and A stimuli. Experiment 2 revealed no significant differences in streaming abilities between normal-hearing and hearing-impaired groups.

Conclusions Overall, results indicate that listeners with normal and impaired hearing have similar auditory streaming abilities for broadband inharmonic complex stimuli.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Grant DC 005835 from the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders. The authors thank Melissa Papesh for assistance with data collection and Larry Humes for valuable comments on this article and assistance in interpreting the data.
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