The Detection and Monitoring of Comprehension Errors by Preschool Children With and Without Language Impairment Purpose In this study, the authors examined emerging comprehension monitoring, including error detection, evaluation, and correction within the context of story understanding in preschool children with and without language impairment. Method Thirty-seven children between the ages of 30 and 61 months completed an online comprehension monitoring task. There ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2008
The Detection and Monitoring of Comprehension Errors by Preschool Children With and Without Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Skarakis-Doyle
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Lynn Dempsey
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Elizabeth Skarakis-Doyle, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Elborn College, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G 1H1, Canada. E-mail: eskaraki@uwo.ca.
  • Lynn Dempsey is now at the Department of Applied Linguistics, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.
    Lynn Dempsey is now at the Department of Applied Linguistics, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2008
The Detection and Monitoring of Comprehension Errors by Preschool Children With and Without Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1227-1243. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0136)
History: Received June 21, 2007 , Revised September 17, 2007 , Accepted January 20, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1227-1243. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0136)
History: Received June 21, 2007; Revised September 17, 2007; Accepted January 20, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Purpose In this study, the authors examined emerging comprehension monitoring, including error detection, evaluation, and correction within the context of story understanding in preschool children with and without language impairment.

Method Thirty-seven children between the ages of 30 and 61 months completed an online comprehension monitoring task. There were 3 groups: 10 children with language impairment, 13 typically developing children who were matched for age, and 14 typically developing children who were matched for receptive vocabulary.

Results Analyses of variance revealed that children with language impairment attained significantly lower scores on the comprehension monitoring task than both age-matched and language-matched groups.

Conclusion The skills underlying successful comprehension monitoring that may be affected in young children with language impairment are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Toronto Hospital for Sick Kids Foundation Grant XG01-081 and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, Children With Special Needs Branch. Portions of this work were presented at the Symposium on Research in Children Language Disorders in June 2005.
The late Siobhan Wootton made significant contributions to this work in its earliest stages. Her creativity, scholarship, and dedication to children with language impairments will always be remembered. Additionally, we express our appreciation to Joselynne Jaques for her multiple contributions, including as project manager, and to Melanie Beaudin, Ken Meadow, Sarah Pifher, and Brooke Thornton for their assistance with data collection and analyses. We are particularly grateful to Linda Milosky and Wenonah Campbell for their support and discussions of this topic as well as for their insightful comments on earlier versions of the article. Finally, we extend gratitude to the children, parents, and clinicians who participated or otherwise assisted in this study.
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