Phonological Awareness in Preschoolers With Spoken Language Impairment: Toward a Better Understanding of Causal Relationships and Effective Intervention. A Constructive Comment on Rvachew and Grawburg’s (2006) Study Purpose This comment refers to a recent study of S. Rvachew and M. Grawburg (2006)  that compared the fit of 2 models of the relationships among speech perception, receptive vocabulary, articulation, phonological awareness, and emergent literacy knowledge in preschoolers with speech sound disorders. Conclusion It is argued that ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   October 01, 2008
Phonological Awareness in Preschoolers With Spoken Language Impairment: Toward a Better Understanding of Causal Relationships and Effective Intervention. A Constructive Comment onRvachew and Grawburg’s (2006)  Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erich Hartmann
    University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Contact author: Erich Hartmann, Institute of Special Education, University of Fribourg, Petrus-Kanisius-Gasse 21, CH-1700, Fribourg, Switzerland.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   October 01, 2008
Phonological Awareness in Preschoolers With Spoken Language Impairment: Toward a Better Understanding of Causal Relationships and Effective Intervention. A Constructive Comment onRvachew and Grawburg’s (2006)  Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1215-1218. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/06-0092)
History: Received May 24, 2006 , Accepted March 6, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1215-1218. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/06-0092)
History: Received May 24, 2006; Accepted March 6, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose This comment refers to a recent study of S. Rvachew and M. Grawburg (2006)  that compared the fit of 2 models of the relationships among speech perception, receptive vocabulary, articulation, phonological awareness, and emergent literacy knowledge in preschoolers with speech sound disorders.

Conclusion It is argued that phonological working memory is an important additional variable to be included in the model preferred by Rvachew and Grawburg (2006) . Furthermore, the model should take into account the reciprocal relationship between phonological awareness and emergent literacy skills that is already evident at the preschool level. This could lead to a more precise assessment of preschoolers with speech impairment and, above all, to more efficient preventive intervention.

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