Submental sEMG and Hyoid Movement During Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, and Expiratory Muscle Strength Training Purpose This study investigated the concurrent biomechanical and electromyographic properties of 2 swallow-specific tasks (effortful swallow and Mendelsohn maneuver) and 1 swallow-nonspecific (expiratory muscle strength training [EMST]) swallow therapy task in order to examine the differential effects of each on hyoid motion and associated submental activation in healthy adults, with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2008
Submental sEMG and Hyoid Movement During Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, and Expiratory Muscle Strength Training
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen M. Wheeler-Hegland
    Arizona State University, Tucson
  • John C. Rosenbek
    University of Florida
  • Christine M. Sapienza
    University of Florida
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    Christine M. Sapienza is the co-inventor of the expiratory muscle strength training device used in this study, and she sits on the scientific advisory board for the company.
    Christine M. Sapienza is the co-inventor of the expiratory muscle strength training device used in this study, and she sits on the scientific advisory board for the company.×
  • Contact author: Karen M. Wheeler-Hegland, who is now with the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, P.O. Box 117420, Gainesville, FL 32611. E-mail: kwheeler@ufl.edu.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2008
Submental sEMG and Hyoid Movement During Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, and Expiratory Muscle Strength Training
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1072-1087. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0016)
History: Received January 22, 2007 , Accepted November 28, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2008, Vol. 51, 1072-1087. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0016)
History: Received January 22, 2007; Accepted November 28, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 28

Purpose This study investigated the concurrent biomechanical and electromyographic properties of 2 swallow-specific tasks (effortful swallow and Mendelsohn maneuver) and 1 swallow-nonspecific (expiratory muscle strength training [EMST]) swallow therapy task in order to examine the differential effects of each on hyoid motion and associated submental activation in healthy adults, with the overall goal of characterizing task-specific and overload properties of each task.

Method Twenty-five healthy male and female adults (M = 25 years of age) participated in this prospective, experimental study with 1 participant group. Each participant completed all study tasks (including normal swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver swallow, effortful swallow, and EMST task) in random order during concurrent videofluoroscopy and surface electromyography recording.

Results Results revealed significant differences in the trajectory of hyoid motion as measured by overall displacement and angle of elevation of the hyoid bone. As well, timing of hyoid movement and amplitude differences existed between tasks with regard to the activation of the submental musculature.

Conclusions Study results demonstrated differential effects of the 3 experimental tasks on the principles of task specificity and overload. These principles are important in the development of effective rehabilitative programs. Subsequent direction for future research is suggested.

Acknowledgments
The first author would like to extend appreciation to Nan Musson and members of the Speech Pathology Service at the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center in Gainesville, Florida, for their support and contribution of resources. Additionally, the first author would like to thank members of her dissertation committee, including Christine Sapienza, John Rosenbek, Paul Davenport, and W. S. Brown for their guidance and mentoring throughout this project.
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