Fast Mapping and Word Learning by Preschoolers With Specific Language Impairment in a Supported Learning Context: Effect of Encoding Cues, Phonotactic Probability, and Object Familiarity PurposeTo investigate whether phonological or semantic encoding cues improved the fast mapping or word learning performance of preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI) or typical development (TD) and whether performance varied for words containing high- or low-frequency sublexical sequences that named familiar or unfamiliar objects.MethodForty-two preschoolers with SLI, 42 preschoolers ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2011
Fast Mapping and Word Learning by Preschoolers With Specific Language Impairment in a Supported Learning Context: Effect of Encoding Cues, Phonotactic Probability, and Object Familiarity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shelley Gray
    Arizona State University, Tempe
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Shara Brinkley
    Arizona State University, Tempe
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Correspondence to Shelley Gray: shelley.gray@asu.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Susan Rvachew
    Associate Editor: Susan Rvachew×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article   |   June 01, 2011
Fast Mapping and Word Learning by Preschoolers With Specific Language Impairment in a Supported Learning Context: Effect of Encoding Cues, Phonotactic Probability, and Object Familiarity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 870-884. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0285)
History: Received December 31, 2009 , Revised May 17, 2010 , Accepted September 27, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 870-884. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0285)
History: Received December 31, 2009; Revised May 17, 2010; Accepted September 27, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 24

PurposeTo investigate whether phonological or semantic encoding cues improved the fast mapping or word learning performance of preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI) or typical development (TD) and whether performance varied for words containing high- or low-frequency sublexical sequences that named familiar or unfamiliar objects.

MethodForty-two preschoolers with SLI, 42 preschoolers with TD matched for age and gender to the children with SLI, and 41 preschoolers with TD matched for expressive vocabulary and gender to the children with SLI learned words in a supported learning context. Fast mapping, word learning, and post-task performance were assessed.

ResultsEncoding cues had no effect on fast mapping performance for any group or on the number of words children learned to comprehend. Encoding cues appeared to be detrimental to word production for children with TD. Across groups, a clear learning advantage was observed for words with low-frequency sequences and, to a lesser extent, words associated with an unfamiliar object.

ConclusionThe results suggest that phonotactic probability and previous lexical knowledge affect word learning in similar ways for children with TD and SLI and that encoding cues were not beneficial for any group.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5R01DC7417-2 to the first author.
We sincerely appreciate the participation of children, families, and staff from the following Arizona school districts and preschools: Chandler Unified School District, Mesa Public Schools, Kyrene School District No. 28, Scottsdale Unified School District, Bright Horizons Family Solutions in Chandler and Tempe, Cactus Preschool in Tempe, the Campus Children’s Center, First Congregational Preschool, Fit N Fun Children’s Center, Little Explorer’s Preschool and Childcare, Maxwell Preschool Academy in Chandler, Success Center Family Child Care, Tempe Christian School, and the Valley Children’s Center in Chandler.
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