Chronic Stimulation–Induced Changes in the Rodent Thyroarytenoid Muscle PurposeTherapies for certain voice disorders purport principles of skeletal muscle rehabilitation to increase muscle mass, strength, and endurance. However, applicability of limb muscle rehabilitation to the laryngeal muscles has not been tested. In this study, the authors examined the feasibility of the rat thyroarytenoid muscle to remodel as a consequence ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2011
Chronic Stimulation–Induced Changes in the Rodent Thyroarytenoid Muscle
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Colleen A. McMullen
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Timothy A. Butterfield
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Maria Dietrich
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Richard D. Andreatta
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Francisco H. Andrade
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Lisa Fry
    Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia
    Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia
  • Joseph C. Stemple
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Correspondence to Colleen McMullen: cmcmu2@email.uky.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Jiang
    Associate Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Research Note   |   June 01, 2011
Chronic Stimulation–Induced Changes in the Rodent Thyroarytenoid Muscle
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 845-853. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0127)
History: Received May 12, 2010 , Revised September 17, 2010 , Accepted October 25, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 845-853. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0127)
History: Received May 12, 2010; Revised September 17, 2010; Accepted October 25, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

PurposeTherapies for certain voice disorders purport principles of skeletal muscle rehabilitation to increase muscle mass, strength, and endurance. However, applicability of limb muscle rehabilitation to the laryngeal muscles has not been tested. In this study, the authors examined the feasibility of the rat thyroarytenoid muscle to remodel as a consequence of increased activity instantiated through chronic electrical stimulation.

MethodTwenty adult Sprague-Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus), assigned to a 1-week or 2-week stimulation group, were implanted with a nerve cuff electrode placed around the right recurrent laryngeal nerve and were fitted with a head connector. All animals were placed under anesthesia twice a day for 1 hr each time. Following the training, rats were killed, and thyroarytenoid muscles were isolated for histology and immunohistochemistry.

ResultsMean muscle fiber area decreased, neuromuscular junction density increased, mitochondrial content increased qualitatively, and glycogen-positive fibers increased, demonstrating exercise-induced changes similar to those seen in limb muscles after endurance training.

ConclusionRat thyroarytenoid muscles are capable of remodeling in response to chronic electrical stimulation.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants EY1 2998 (awarded to F. H. Andrade), DC007983 (awarded to C. A. McMullen), and a University of Kentucky Faculty Research Grant (awarded to J. C. Stemple). We thank Josh Bose, Daniel Croake, Scott E. Diamond, Anysia Ensslen, Ashwini Joshi, Lauren Rhodes, Anna Mary Richmond, and Thomas Ridge for technical assistance.
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