Modulation of Neck Intermuscular Beta Coherence During Voice and Speech Production PurposeThe purpose of this study was to better understand neck intermuscular beta coherence (15–35 Hz; NIBcoh) in healthy individuals, with respect to modulation by behavioral tasks.MethodMean NIBcoh was measured using surface electromyography at 2 anterior neck locations in 10 individuals during normal speech, static nonspeech maneuvers, “clear” speech (intentionally produced ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2011
Modulation of Neck Intermuscular Beta Coherence During Voice and Speech Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Harvard-MIT Division of Health Science & Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Harvard-MIT Division of Health Science & Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • James T. Heaton
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Boston, MA
  • Correspondence to Cara E. Stepp: cstepp@alum.mit.edu
  • Cara E. Stepp is now at the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Engineering and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.
    Cara E. Stepp is now at the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Engineering and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.×
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Susan Thibeault
    Associate Editor: Susan Thibeault×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   June 01, 2011
Modulation of Neck Intermuscular Beta Coherence During Voice and Speech Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 836-844. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0139)
History: Received May 26, 2010 , Revised October 3, 2010 , Accepted October 25, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 836-844. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0139)
History: Received May 26, 2010; Revised October 3, 2010; Accepted October 25, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to better understand neck intermuscular beta coherence (15–35 Hz; NIBcoh) in healthy individuals, with respect to modulation by behavioral tasks.

MethodMean NIBcoh was measured using surface electromyography at 2 anterior neck locations in 10 individuals during normal speech, static nonspeech maneuvers, “clear” speech (intentionally produced to maximize intelligibility), divided-attention speech, singing, and mimicked hyperfunctional speech.

ResultsAn analysis of variance showed significant effects of both individual and condition (p = .001) on the mean beta-band intermuscular coherence. Dunnett’s simultaneous paired t tests found decreased NIBcoh during low-attention speech, singing, and hyperfunctional speech (padj < .05), but no significant difference in NIBcoh during nonspeech tasks or clear speech production relative to normal speech.

ConclusionsCompared with normal speech, mean NIBcoh was decreased in a divided-attention speech task, but clear speech did not result in increased mean coherence relative to normal speech, possibly due to ceiling effects caused by heightened attention and precision during experimental recording. Mimicking a strained, hyperfunctional voice resulted in a reduction in mean beta intermuscular coherence quantitatively and qualitatively similar to the lowered values of mean beta coherence seen in individuals with vocal nodules relative to individuals with normal voice.

Acknowledgment
Thanks to Maia N. Braden and Marie E. Jetté for assistance with strain ratings and Serge Roy for helpful comments.
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