Hyoid Displacement in Post-Treatment Cancer Patients: Preliminary Findings PurposeDysphagia after head and neck cancer treatment is a health care issue; in some cases, the cause of death is not cancer but, rather, the passage of food or liquid into the lungs. Hyoid displacement is known to be important to safe swallowing function. The purpose of this study was ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2011
Hyoid Displacement in Post-Treatment Cancer Patients: Preliminary Findings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yihe Zu
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Zhenyu Yang
    Florida International University, Miami
    Florida International University, Miami
  • Adrienne L. Perlman
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Correspondence to Yihe Zu: yihezu2@illinois.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling
    Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Speech
Article   |   June 01, 2011
Hyoid Displacement in Post-Treatment Cancer Patients: Preliminary Findings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 813-820. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0077)
History: Received March 25, 2010 , Revised August 10, 2010 , Accepted October 15, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 813-820. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0077)
History: Received March 25, 2010; Revised August 10, 2010; Accepted October 15, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposeDysphagia after head and neck cancer treatment is a health care issue; in some cases, the cause of death is not cancer but, rather, the passage of food or liquid into the lungs. Hyoid displacement is known to be important to safe swallowing function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate hyoid displacement after cancer treatment.

MethodHyoid displacement was measured in healthy persons with normal swallowing function, head and neck cancer patients postradiation only, and head and neck cancer patients postsurgery only. Three bolus conditions (5 ml and 10 ml liquid and 5 ml paste) were examined. The influence of 2 different measurement algorithms on the extent of hyoid movement was also explored.

ResultsRadiation-therapy patients in this study had greater hyoid displacement than did surgery patients. Bolus viscosity and measurement method significantly influenced displacement results, whereas bolus volume did not. However, more multiple swallows occurred with 10 ml liquid; this may account for the apparent insignificance of bolus volume.

ConclusionsThese findings can be used to assist head and neck cancer treatment planning and counseling. Because hyoid measurement methods influence research conclusions, this aspect of design should be considered when interpreting research findings.

Acknowledgment
The research for this manuscript was funded, in part, by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant RO1 DC005603-01A2.
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