Linguistic Complexity, Speech Production, and Comprehension in Parkinson’s Disease: Behavioral and Physiological Indices PurposeTo investigate the effects of increased syntactic complexity and utterance length demands on speech production and comprehension in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) using behavioral and physiological measures.MethodSpeech response latency, interarticulatory coordinative consistency, accuracy of speech production, and response latency and accuracy on a receptive language task were analyzed in ... Article
Article  |   June 2011
Linguistic Complexity, Speech Production, and Comprehension in Parkinson’s Disease: Behavioral and Physiological Indices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bridget Walsh
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Anne Smith
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Correspondence to Bridget Walsh: bridget@purdue.edu
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Associate Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   June 2011
Linguistic Complexity, Speech Production, and Comprehension in Parkinson’s Disease: Behavioral and Physiological Indices
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 787-802. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0085)
History: Received May 6, 2009 , Revised April 19, 2010 , Accepted October 4, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 787-802. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0085)
History: Received May 6, 2009; Revised April 19, 2010; Accepted October 4, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9
Acknowledgments
This article is based on a dissertation submitted by the first author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Neuroscience and Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences from Purdue University. Support for this research was made possible through National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant F31DC007267-01, Indiana Lions Club Grant 67313533762, and Parkinson’s Awareness Association of Central Indiana Grant 201116. We wish to express our sincere appreciation to each of our participants; without their efforts, this research would not have been possible. We would like to acknowledge the guidance and input of Jessica Huber, Bob Meisel, and Chris Weber-Fox. Finally, we are grateful to Janna Berlin, Lisa Beehler, and Jessie Grskovic for their help with data collection and analysis.

PurposeTo investigate the effects of increased syntactic complexity and utterance length demands on speech production and comprehension in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) using behavioral and physiological measures.

MethodSpeech response latency, interarticulatory coordinative consistency, accuracy of speech production, and response latency and accuracy on a receptive language task were analyzed in 16 individuals with PD and 16 matched control participants.

ResultsIndividuals with PD had higher oral motor coordination variability, took a longer time to initiate speech, and made more errors on the speaking task compared with the control group. They also received lower scores on the 2 complex conditions of the receptive language task. Increased length and syntactic complexity negatively affected performance in both groups of speakers.

ConclusionsThese findings provide a novel window into the speech deficits associated with PD by examining performance on longer, sentence-level utterances in contrast to earlier investigations of single-word or nonword productions. Speech motor control processes and language comprehension were adversely affected in the majority of our participants with mild to moderate PD compared to the control group. Finally, increased syntactic complexity and sentence length affected both the healthy aging and PD groups' speech production performance at the behavioral and kinematic levels.

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