The Influence of Auditory Acuity on Acoustic Variability and the Use of Motor Equivalence During Adaptation to a Perturbation PurposeThe aim of this study was to relate speakers' auditory acuity for the sibilant contrast, their use of motor equivalent trading relationships in producing the sibilant /ʃ/, and their produced acoustic distance between the sibilants /s/ and /ʃ/. Specifically, the study tested the hypotheses that during adaptation to a perturbation ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2011
The Influence of Auditory Acuity on Acoustic Variability and the Use of Motor Equivalence During Adaptation to a Perturbation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jana Brunner
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Satrajit Ghosh
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Philip Hoole
    Institut für Phonetik und Sprachverarbeitung, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany
    Institut für Phonetik und Sprachverarbeitung, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Melanie Matthies
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Mark Tiede
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Joseph Perkell
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
    Speech Communication Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Correspondence to Jana Brunner: jana.brunner@uni-potsdam.de
  • Jana Brunner is now with the German Department, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Jana Brunner is now with the German Department, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.×
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   June 01, 2011
The Influence of Auditory Acuity on Acoustic Variability and the Use of Motor Equivalence During Adaptation to a Perturbation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 727-739. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0256)
History: Received December 1, 2009 , Revised July 1, 2010 , Accepted September 21, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2011, Vol. 54, 727-739. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0256)
History: Received December 1, 2009; Revised July 1, 2010; Accepted September 21, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

PurposeThe aim of this study was to relate speakers' auditory acuity for the sibilant contrast, their use of motor equivalent trading relationships in producing the sibilant /ʃ/, and their produced acoustic distance between the sibilants /s/ and /ʃ/. Specifically, the study tested the hypotheses that during adaptation to a perturbation of vocal-tract shape, high-acuity speakers use motor equivalence strategies to a greater extent than do low-acuity speakers in order to reach their smaller phonemic goal regions, and that high-acuity speakers produce greater acoustic distance between 2 sibilant phonemes than do low-acuity speakers.

MethodArticulographic data from 7 German speakers adapting to a perturbation were analyzed for the use of motor equivalence. The speakers' produced acoustic distance between /s/ and /ʃ/ was calculated. Auditory acuity was assessed for the same speakers.

ResultsHigh-acuity speakers used motor equivalence to a greater extent when adapting to a perturbation than did low-acuity speakers. Additionally, high-acuity speakers produced greater acoustic contrasts than did low-acuity-speakers. It was observed that speech rate had an influence on the use of motor equivalence: Slow speakers used motor equivalence to a lesser degree than did fast speakers.

ConclusionThese results provide support for the mutual interdependence of speech perception and production.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) grant to the first author for carrying out postdoctoral research and by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01DC00925 (J. Perkell, P.I.). Thanks to Jörg Dreyer and Melanie Weirich for carrying out perception tests.
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