Research Note  |   October 2010
Identifying Behavioral Measures of Stress in Individuals With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jacqueline S. Laures-Gore
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Michaela F. DuBay
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Melissa C. Duff
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Tony W. Buchanan
    Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO
  • Contact author: Jacqueline S. Laures-Gore, Communication Disorders Program, Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3979, Atlanta, GA 30302-3979. E-mail: spejsl@langate.gsu.edu.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Research Note   |   October 2010
Identifying Behavioral Measures of Stress in Individuals With Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1394-1400. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0236)
History: Revised February 10, 2009 , Received October 29, 2009 , Accepted February 17, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1394-1400. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0236)
History: Revised February 10, 2009; Received October 29, 2009; Accepted February 17, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose: To develop valid indicators of stress in individuals with aphasia (IWA) by examining the relationship between certain language variables (error frequency [EF] and word productivity [WP]) and cortisol reactivity.

Method: Fourteen IWA and 10 controls participated in a speaking task. Salivary cortisol was collected pre- and posttask. WP and EF were calculated from the language sample elicited during the speaking task.

Results: As expected, IWA had less WP and a higher EF than did control participants, and these effects were related to aphasia severity. Cortisol reactivity of IWA was moderately associated with WP, such that those with higher WP showed greater cortisol reactivity. The control group did not demonstrate this relation. Neither group demonstrated a relation between salivary cortisol reactivity and EF.

Conclusion: WP in individuals with aphasia holds potential as a behavioral index of stress in this population.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R03 DC006177 and internal grants from Georgia State University.
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