Expressive Language Profiles of Verbally Expressive Adolescents and Young Adults With Down Syndrome or Fragile X Syndrome PurposeIn this study, the authors examined the expressive language abilities of a subset of highly verbally expressive adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS) and those with fragile X syndrome (FXS) for evidence of syndrome-related differences. FXS gender differences were also examined in an exploratory fashion.MethodThe authors evaluated 24 ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Expressive Language Profiles of Verbally Expressive Adolescents and Young Adults With Down Syndrome or Fragile X Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lizbeth H. Finestack
    University of Minnesota
  • Leonard Abbeduto
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Contact author: Lizbeth H. Finestack, University of Minnesota, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, 164 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail: finestack@umn.edu.
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Expressive Language Profiles of Verbally Expressive Adolescents and Young Adults With Down Syndrome or Fragile X Syndrome
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1334-1348. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0125)
History: Received June 22, 2009 , Revised November 3, 2009 , Accepted February 14, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1334-1348. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0125)
History: Received June 22, 2009; Revised November 3, 2009; Accepted February 14, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 37

PurposeIn this study, the authors examined the expressive language abilities of a subset of highly verbally expressive adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS) and those with fragile X syndrome (FXS) for evidence of syndrome-related differences. FXS gender differences were also examined in an exploratory fashion.

MethodThe authors evaluated 24 adolescents and young adults with DS, 17 adolescents and young adults with FXS, and 21 children with typical development (TD), with the groups matched on nonverbal mental age. Language ability was examined using the Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS; Carrow-Woolfolk, 1995) and Developmental Sentence Scoring (DSS; Lee, 1974) scores derived from an oral narrative language sample.

ResultsStudy analyses revealed the following group differences: The FXS group outperformed the DS and TD groups on the OWLS measure; the TD group outperformed both other groups on some of the DSS measures; the FXS group outperformed the DS group on the DSS Sentence Point measure; and females with FXS outperformed males with FXS on several measures.

ConclusionsResults contribute to the ongoing construction of the language phenotypes of individuals with DS and individuals with FXS and support the conclusion that there are quantitative rather than qualitative differences in their expressive language profiles.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this article was supported by the following grant awards from the National Institutes of Health: R01HD024356, T32HD007489, and P30HD003352. Parts of this study were presented at the 2009 Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders in Madison, WI. We are indebted to all of the participants and their families for making this project possible. Thanks also to Susen Schroeder for her oversight of the language transcription activities for the project and to Norah Garrity and Samantha Hagness for their coding assistance.
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