The Role of Vocal Practice in Constructing Phonological Working Memory PurposeIn this study, the authors looked for effects of vocal practice on phonological working memory.MethodA longitudinal design was used, combining both naturalistic observations and a nonword repetition test. Fifteen 26-month-olds (12 of whom were followed from age 11 months) were administered a nonword test including real words, “standard” nonwords (identical ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
The Role of Vocal Practice in Constructing Phonological Working Memory
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tamar Keren-Portnoy
    University of York, Heslington, York, United Kingdom
  • Marilyn M. Vihman
    University of York, Heslington, York, United Kingdom
  • Rory A. DePaolis
    James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
  • Chris J. Whitaker
    Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom
  • Nicola M. Williams
    University of York
  • Contact author: Tamar Keren-Portnoy, Department of Language and Linguistic Science, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom. E-mail: tkp502@york.ac.uk.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article   |   October 01, 2010
The Role of Vocal Practice in Constructing Phonological Working Memory
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1280-1293. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/09-0003)
History: Received January 8, 2009 , Revised August 7, 2009 , Accepted December 17, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1280-1293. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/09-0003)
History: Received January 8, 2009; Revised August 7, 2009; Accepted December 17, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

PurposeIn this study, the authors looked for effects of vocal practice on phonological working memory.

MethodA longitudinal design was used, combining both naturalistic observations and a nonword repetition test. Fifteen 26-month-olds (12 of whom were followed from age 11 months) were administered a nonword test including real words, “standard” nonwords (identical for all children), and nonwords based on individual children’s production inventory (in and out words).

ResultsA strong relationship was found between (a) length of experience with consonant production and (b) nonword repetition and between (a) differential experience with specific consonants through production and (b) performance on the in versus out words.

ConclusionsPerformance depended on familiarity with words or their subunits and was strongest for real words, weaker for in words, and weakest for out words. The results demonstrate the important role of speech production in the construction of phonological working memory.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship to the first author, within the 6th European Community Framework Programme. We would like to thank Pam Martin, who transcribed many of the naturalistic sessions used in this article, and the families who participated in the study.
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