Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations PurposeIn this investigation, the authors determined the strength of association between tongue kinematic and speech acoustics changes in response to speaking rate and loudness manipulations. Performance changes in the kinematic and acoustic domains were measured using two aspects of speech production presumably affecting speech clarity: phonetic specification and variability.MethodTongue movements ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Antje S. Mefferd
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Jordan R. Green
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Contact author: Antje Mefferd, who is now with the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Wichita State University, 401 East Ahlberg Hall, Wichita, KS 67260-0075. E-mail: antje.mefferd@wichita.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1206-1219. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0083)
History: Received April 30, 2009 , Revised October 8, 2009 , Accepted February 12, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1206-1219. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0083)
History: Received April 30, 2009; Revised October 8, 2009; Accepted February 12, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 20

PurposeIn this investigation, the authors determined the strength of association between tongue kinematic and speech acoustics changes in response to speaking rate and loudness manipulations. Performance changes in the kinematic and acoustic domains were measured using two aspects of speech production presumably affecting speech clarity: phonetic specification and variability.

MethodTongue movements for the vowels /ia/ were recorded in 10 healthy adults during habitual, fast, slow, and loud speech using three-dimensional electromagnetic articulography. To determine articulatory-to-acoustic relations for phonetic specification, the authors correlated changes in lingual displacement with changes in acoustic vowel distance. To determine articulatory-to-acoustic relations for phonetic variability, the authors correlated changes in lingual movement variability with changes in formant movement variability.

ResultsA significant positive linear association was found for kinematic and acoustic specification but not for kinematic and acoustic variability. Several significant speaking task effects were also observed.

ConclusionLingual displacement is a good predictor of acoustic vowel distance in healthy talkers. The weak association between kinematic and acoustic variability raises questions regarding the effects of articulatory variability on speech clarity and intelligibility, particularly in individuals with motor speech disorders.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Barkley Trust and Research Grant Number R01 DC009890 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, awarded to the second author. Parts of this work were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in San Diego, California (November 2005); at the Motor Speech Conference in Austin, Texas (March, 2006); and at the International Conference on Speech Motor Control in Nijmegen, the Netherlands (June 2006). We would like to thank Erin Wilson, Ignatius Nip, and Yana Yunusova for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this article.
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