Mood and Substance Use Disorders Among Adults Seeking Speech Treatment for Stuttering ObjectivesStuttering has been associated with a range of anxiety disorders, including social phobia. In the general community, anxiety disorders are frequently associated with increased rates of mood and substance use disorders. Therefore, in the present study, the authors sought to determine the rate of mood and substance use disorders among ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Mood and Substance Use Disorders Among Adults Seeking Speech Treatment for Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa Iverach
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Mark Jones
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Sue O’Brian
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Susan Block
    La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
  • Michelle Lincoln
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Elisabeth Harrison
    Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
  • Sally Hewat
    The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia
  • Ross G. Menzies
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Contact author: Mark Onslow, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW 2141 Australia. E-mail: m.onslow@usyd.edu.au.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Mood and Substance Use Disorders Among Adults Seeking Speech Treatment for Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1178-1190. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0166)
History: Received August 10, 2009 , Revised October 26, 2009 , Accepted January 25, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1178-1190. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0166)
History: Received August 10, 2009; Revised October 26, 2009; Accepted January 25, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

ObjectivesStuttering has been associated with a range of anxiety disorders, including social phobia. In the general community, anxiety disorders are frequently associated with increased rates of mood and substance use disorders. Therefore, in the present study, the authors sought to determine the rate of mood and substance use disorders among adults who stutter.

MethodThe study employed a matched case–control design. Participants included 92 adults seeking treatment for stuttering and 920 age- and gender-matched controls. Mental health assessments were conducted via a computerized psychiatric diagnostic interview. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios for the prevalence of mood and substance use disorders in both groups.

ResultsWhen compared with matched controls, adults seeking treatment for stuttering had twofold increased odds of meeting criteria for a 12-month diagnosis of any mood disorder but were not found to report significantly higher lifetime prevalence rates for any substance use disorder.

ConclusionsAlthough adults who stutter in the present study were characterized by significantly higher rates of mood disorders than matched controls, they do not appear to self-medicate with substances such as alcohol. Results are discussed in terms of treatment implications and possible reasons why adults who stutter may avoid alcohol.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Program Grant 402763.
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