Voice and Fluency Changes as a Function of Speech Task and Deep Brain Stimulation PurposeSpeaking, which naturally occurs in different modes or “tasks” such as conversation and repetition, relies on intact basal ganglia nuclei. Recent studies suggest that voice and fluency parameters are differentially affected by speech task. In this study, the authors examine the effects of subcortical functionality on voice and fluency, comparing ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Voice and Fluency Changes as a Function of Speech Task and Deep Brain Stimulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diana Van Lancker Sidtis
    The Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, and New York University, New York, NY
  • Tiffany Rogers
    The Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, and New York University, New York, NY
  • Violette Godier
    The Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research
  • Michele Tagliati
    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • John J. Sidtis
    The Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and New York University School of Medicine
  • Contact author: Diana Van Lancker Sidtis, Department of Communicative Science and Disorders, New York University, 665 Broadway, Room 936, New York, NY 10012. E-mail: diana.sidtis@nyu.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Voice and Fluency Changes as a Function of Speech Task and Deep Brain Stimulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1167-1177. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0154)
History: Received July 30, 2009 , Accepted January 8, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1167-1177. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0154)
History: Received July 30, 2009; Accepted January 8, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

PurposeSpeaking, which naturally occurs in different modes or “tasks” such as conversation and repetition, relies on intact basal ganglia nuclei. Recent studies suggest that voice and fluency parameters are differentially affected by speech task. In this study, the authors examine the effects of subcortical functionality on voice and fluency, comparing measures obtained from spontaneous and matched repeated speech samples.

MethodSubjects with Parkinson’s disease who were being treated with bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nuclei were tested with stimulators ON and OFF.

ResultsThe study found that a voice measure, harmonic to noise ratio, is improved in repetition and in the DBS-ON condition and that dysfluencies are more plentiful in conversation with little or variable influence of DBS condition.

ConclusionsThese findings suggest that voice and fluency are differentially affected by DBS treatment and that task conditions, interacting with subcortical functionality, influence motor speech performance.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC007658 and the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation. Kelly Bridges, Krista Cameron, Dora Katsnelson, Judy Yuen, Lisa Yeung, and Elizabeth Sweeting assisted in data acquisition, management, and analysis. Ji Sook Ahn’s translation of the article by Sung et al. (2004)  from the original Korean is greatly appreciated.
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