An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Altered Auditory Feedback on the Conversational Speech of Adults Who Stutter PurposeTo investigate the impact on percentage of syllables stuttered of various durations of delayed auditory feedback (DAF), levels of frequency-altered feedback (FAF), and masking auditory feedback (MAF) during conversational speech.MethodEleven adults who stuttered produced 10-min conversational speech samples during a control condition and under 4 different combinations of DAF, FAF, ... Article
Article  |   October 2010
An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Altered Auditory Feedback on the Conversational Speech of Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle Lincoln
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Mark Jones
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Contact author: Mark Onslow, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, New South Wales 1825, Australia. E-mail: mark.onslow@sydney.edu.au.
  • © 2010 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 2010
An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Altered Auditory Feedback on the Conversational Speech of Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1122-1131. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0266)
History: Received December 3, 2007 , Revised August 18, 2008 , Accepted December 24, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1122-1131. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0266)
History: Received December 3, 2007; Revised August 18, 2008; Accepted December 24, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposeTo investigate the impact on percentage of syllables stuttered of various durations of delayed auditory feedback (DAF), levels of frequency-altered feedback (FAF), and masking auditory feedback (MAF) during conversational speech.

MethodEleven adults who stuttered produced 10-min conversational speech samples during a control condition and under 4 different combinations of DAF, FAF, and MAF. Participants also read aloud in a control condition with DAF and FAF.

ResultsA statistically significant difference was found between the NAF conversation condition and the 4 combined altered auditory feedback (AAF) conditions. No statistically significant differences in percentage of syllables stuttered were found in conversation or reading between the control conditions and the FAF/DAF or MAF conditions. The analysis of individual participants' data showed highly individual responsiveness to different conditions.

ConclusionsParticipants' varying responses to differing AAF settings likely accounted for the failure to find group differences between conditions. These results suggest that studies that use standard DAF and FAF settings for all participants are likely to underestimate any AAF effect. It is not yet possible to predict who will benefit from AAF devices in everyday situations and the extent of those benefits.

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