Normative Data for the Words-in-Noise Test for 6- to 12-Year-Old Children PurposeTo establish normative data for children on the Words-in-Noise Test (WIN; R. H. Wilson, 2003; R. H. Wilson & R. McArdle, 2007).MethodForty-two children in each of 7 age groups, ranging in age from 6 to 12 years (n = 294), and 24 young adults (age range: 18–27 years) with normal ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Normative Data for the Words-in-Noise Test for 6- to 12-Year-Old Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard H. Wilson
    James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, TN, and East Tennessee State University, Johnson City
  • Nicole M. Farmer
    East Tennessee State University
  • Avni Gandhi
    East Tennessee State University
  • Emily Shelburne
    East Tennessee State University
  • Jamie Weaver
    East Tennessee State University
  • Contact author: Richard H. Wilson, Audiology (126/151), VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, TN 37684. E-mail: richard.wilson2@va.gov.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Normative Data for the Words-in-Noise Test for 6- to 12-Year-Old Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1111-1121. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0270)
History: Received December 9, 2009 , Revised February 2, 2010 , Accepted March 25, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1111-1121. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0270)
History: Received December 9, 2009; Revised February 2, 2010; Accepted March 25, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

PurposeTo establish normative data for children on the Words-in-Noise Test (WIN; R. H. Wilson, 2003; R. H. Wilson & R. McArdle, 2007).

MethodForty-two children in each of 7 age groups, ranging in age from 6 to 12 years (n = 294), and 24 young adults (age range: 18–27 years) with normal hearing for pure tones participated. All listeners were screened at 15 dB HL (American National Standards Institute, 2004) with the octave interval between 500 and 4000 Hz. Randomizations of WIN Lists 1, 2, and 1 or WIN Lists 2, 1, and 2 were presented with the noise fixed at 70 dB SPL, followed by presentation at 90 dB SPL of the 70 Northwestern University Auditory Test No. 6 (T. W. Tillman & R. Carhart, 1966) words used in the WIN. Finally, the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test—Revised (L. M. Dunn & L. M. Dunn, 1981) was administered. Testing was conducted in a quiet room.

ResultsThere were 3 main findings: (a) The biggest change in recognition performance occurred between the ages of 6 and 7 years; (b) from 9 to 12 years, recognition performance was stable; and (c) performance by young adults (18–27 years) was slightly better (1–2 dB) than performance by the older children.

ConclusionThe WIN can be used with children as young as 6 years of age; however, age-specific ranges of normal recognition performance must be used.

Acknowledgments
Support for this study was provided by the East Tennessee State University Foundation. The Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, supported this work through a Senior Research Career Scientist award to the first author. This study was made possible by the following institutions: Ashley Academy, Boys and Girls Club, St. Mary’s School, and University School (Johnson City, TN); Tri-Cities Christian School (Blountville, TN); and Flatwoods Elementary (Jonesville, VA). Appreciation is expressed to Rachel McArdle for her expertise with inferential statistics. The contents of this article do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. government. Portions of this article were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA (2009); at the annual meeting of the American Auditory Society in Scottsdale, AZ (2010); and at the American Academy of Audiology Convention in San Diego, CA (2010).
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access