Influence of Broad Auditory Tuning on Across-Frequency Integration of Speech Patterns PurposeThe purpose of the present study was to assess whether diminished tolerance for disruptions to across-frequency timing in listeners with hearing impairment can be attributed to broad auditory tuning.MethodIn 2 experiments in which random assignment was used, sentences were represented as 3 noise bands centered at 530, 1500, and 4243 ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Influence of Broad Auditory Tuning on Across-Frequency Integration of Speech Patterns
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eric W. Healy
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, and University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Kimberly A. Carson
    University of South Carolina
  • Contact author: Eric W. Healy, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, The Ohio State University, Pressey Hall, Room 110, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: healy.66@osu.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Influence of Broad Auditory Tuning on Across-Frequency Integration of Speech Patterns
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1087-1095. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0185)
History: Received August 26, 2009 , Revised January 20, 2010 , Accepted March 22, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1087-1095. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0185)
History: Received August 26, 2009; Revised January 20, 2010; Accepted March 22, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

PurposeThe purpose of the present study was to assess whether diminished tolerance for disruptions to across-frequency timing in listeners with hearing impairment can be attributed to broad auditory tuning.

MethodIn 2 experiments in which random assignment was used, sentences were represented as 3 noise bands centered at 530, 1500, and 4243 Hz, which were amplitude modulated by 3 corresponding narrow speech bands. To isolate broad tuning from other influences of hearing impairment, listeners with normal hearing (45 in Experiment 1 and 30 in Experiment 2) were presented with these vocoder stimuli, having carrier band filter slopes of 12, 24, and 192 dB/octave. These speech patterns were presented in synchrony and with between-band asynchronies up to 40 ms.

ResultsMean intelligibility scores were reduced in conditions of severe, but not moderate, simulated broadening. Although scores fell as asynchrony increased, the steeper drop in performance characteristic of listeners with hearing impairment tested previously was not observed in conditions of simulated broadening.

ConclusionsThe intolerance for small across-frequency asynchronies observed previously does not appear attributable to broad tuning. Instead, the present data suggest that the across-frequency processing mechanism in at least some listeners with hearing impairment might be less robust to this type of degradation.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by National Institues of Health Grant DC08594. The assistance of Karin Jacobus and Kimberlee Crass is gratefully acknowledged, as are comments from Frederic Apoux on an earlier version of this article.
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