Relationships Between Speech Intelligibility and Word Articulation Scores in Children With Hearing Loss PurposeThis investigation sought to determine whether scores from a commonly used word-based articulation test are closely associated with speech intelligibility in children with hearing loss. If the scores are closely related, articulation testing results might be used to estimate intelligibility. If not, the importance of direct assessment of intelligibility is ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Relationships Between Speech Intelligibility and Word Articulation Scores in Children With Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David J. Ertmer
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: David J. Ertmer, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, 500 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2038. E-mail: dertmer@purdue.eud.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Relationships Between Speech Intelligibility and Word Articulation Scores in Children With Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1075-1086. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0250)
History: Received November 17, 2009 , Accepted March 3, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2010, Vol. 53, 1075-1086. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0250)
History: Received November 17, 2009; Accepted March 3, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

PurposeThis investigation sought to determine whether scores from a commonly used word-based articulation test are closely associated with speech intelligibility in children with hearing loss. If the scores are closely related, articulation testing results might be used to estimate intelligibility. If not, the importance of direct assessment of intelligibility is reinforced.

MethodForty-four children with hearing losses produced words from the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation—Second Edition (Goldman & Fristoe, 2000) and sets of 10 short sentences. Correlation analyses were conducted between scores for 7 word-based predictor variables and percent-intelligible scores derived from listener judgments of stimulus sentences.

ResultsSix of 7 predictor variables were significantly correlated with percent-intelligible scores. However, regression analysis revealed that no single predictor variable or multivariable model accounted for more than 25% of the variability in intelligibility scores.

ConclusionsThe findings confirm the importance of assessing connected speech intelligibility directly.

Acknowledgments
This study was completed through the support of grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01DC007863) and the Purdue University Research Foundation. I am especially indebted to the children and parents who made this study possible. Special thanks to Michele Wilkins, Wendy Adler, and Dawn Violetto at Child’s Voice School (Wood Dale, IL); to Mary Daniels, Roseanne Siebert, and Beverly Fears at the St. Joseph Institute (Chesterfield, MO); and to the faculty of these schools for their enthusiastic assistance in carrying out this study. The contributions of Anna Brutsman, Katie Connell, Katie Dobson, Christy Macak, Katie Masterson, Lara Poracki, Elizabeth Robinson, Jennifer Slanker, Elesha Sharp, and Alicia Tam in preparing audio CDs, calculating articulation scores, and estimating reliability are gratefully recognized. Thanks also to Bruce Craig, Yong Wang, and Benjamin Tyner of the Purdue University Statistical Consulting Program for their assistance in conducting statistical analyses.
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