Response to Saltuklaroglu, Kalinowski, and Stuart (2010) PurposeTo reply to the criticisms of Saltuklaroglu, Kalinowski, and Stuart (2010)  by addressing their concerns regarding our study’s methodology, statistical analyses, and findings. Also, to challenge what we view as omissions, misinterpretations, and inaccuracies on their part.ResultsOur operational definition of stuttering was sound. Participant adherence to the treatment protocol was ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   August 01, 2010
Response to Saltuklaroglu, Kalinowski, and Stuart (2010)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ryan Pollard
    University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Don Finan
    University of Northern Colorado, Greeley
  • Peter R. Ramig
    University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Contact author: Ryan Pollard, University of Colorado at Boulder, Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences, 409 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309. E-mail: ryan.pollard@colorado.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech
Letter to the Editor   |   August 01, 2010
Response to Saltuklaroglu, Kalinowski, and Stuart (2010)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2010, Vol. 53, 912-916. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0050)
History: Received February 19, 2010 , Accepted April 27, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2010, Vol. 53, 912-916. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0050)
History: Received February 19, 2010; Accepted April 27, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

PurposeTo reply to the criticisms of Saltuklaroglu, Kalinowski, and Stuart (2010)  by addressing their concerns regarding our study’s methodology, statistical analyses, and findings. Also, to challenge what we view as omissions, misinterpretations, and inaccuracies on their part.

ResultsOur operational definition of stuttering was sound. Participant adherence to the treatment protocol was telling and appropriately enforced. The question-asking task was proper given participant characteristics. Statistical analyses of treatment effects were correctly interpreted. Our general conclusions regarding the clinical merit of the SpeechEasy were misinterpreted by Saltuklaroglu and colleagues; our findings were in fact far less nullifying and more balanced than what they claim.

ConclusionsWhile robust immediate effects of altered auditory feedback (AAF) in the laboratory are well documented, recent longitudinal experiments conducted in naturalistic settings have found less consistent and pronounced effects with the SpeechEasy. These reports also indicate that initial reductions in stuttering are often not maintained over time. Future efforts to determine why this is so would be worthwhile.

Acknowledgment
We thank Phillip Gilley for helpful suggestions regarding statistical methods.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access