Phonological Activation During Visual Word Recognition in Deaf and Hearing Children PurposePhonological activation during visual word recognition was studied in deaf and hearing children under two circumstances: (a) when the use of phonology was not required for task performance and might even hinder it and (b) when the use of phonology was critical for task performance.MethodDeaf children mastering written Dutch and ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2010
Phonological Activation During Visual Word Recognition in Deaf and Hearing Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen Ormel
    Radboud University Nijmegen, Behavioral Science Institute, Centre for Language Studies, the Netherlands
  • Daan Hermans
    Royal Dutch Kentalis, Sint Michielsgestel, the Netherlands
  • Harry Knoors
    Royal Dutch Kentalis and Radboud University Nijmegen, Behavioral Science Institute
  • Angelique Hendriks
    Radboud University Nijmegen, Behavioral Science Institute
  • Ludo Verhoeven
    Radboud University Nijmegen, Behavioral Science Institute
  • Contact author: Ellen Ormel, Radboud University Nijmegen, Centre for Language Studies, Linguistics Department, Erasmusplein 1, 6525 HT, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. E-mail: e.ormel@let.ru.nl.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   August 01, 2010
Phonological Activation During Visual Word Recognition in Deaf and Hearing Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2010, Vol. 53, 801-820. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/08-0033)
History: Received February 8, 2008 , Revised July 13, 2008 , Accepted February 1, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2010, Vol. 53, 801-820. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/08-0033)
History: Received February 8, 2008; Revised July 13, 2008; Accepted February 1, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposePhonological activation during visual word recognition was studied in deaf and hearing children under two circumstances: (a) when the use of phonology was not required for task performance and might even hinder it and (b) when the use of phonology was critical for task performance.

MethodDeaf children mastering written Dutch and Sign Language of the Netherlands were compared with hearing children. Two word–picture verification experiments were conducted, both of which included pseudohomophones. In Experiment 1, the task was to indicate whether the word was spelled correctly and whether it corresponded to the picture. The presence of pseudohomophones was expected to hinder performance only when phonological recoding occurred. In Experiment 2, the task was to indicate whether the word sounded like the picture, which now made phonological recoding essential in order to enable the acceptance of pseudohomophones.

ResultsThe hearing children showed automatic activation of phonology during visual word recognition, regardless of whether they were instructed to focus on orthographic information (Experiment 1) or phonological information (Experiment 2). The deaf children showed little automatic phonological activation in either experiment.

ConclusionDeaf children do not use phonological information during word reading.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Koninklijke Effatha Guyot Groep and Viataal (part of Royal Dutch Kentalis). We would like to thank Wendy Verstegen, Anna Bosman, and Mirjam Broersma for their contribution to this study.
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