Word Learning in Children With Primary Language Impairment: A Meta-Analysis PurposeThe present study is a meta-analysis that examines the difference in novel word learning performance between children with primary language impairment (LI) and typically developing children. Participant and task characteristics were examined as variables that potentially moderated children’s word learning.MethodEight hundred and forty-six published studies were retrieved from conventional databases ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2010
Word Learning in Children With Primary Language Impairment: A Meta-Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pui Fong Kan
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Jennifer Windsor
    University of Minnesota
  • Contact author: Pui Fong Kan, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, 2501 Kittredge Loop Road, 409 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309. E-mail: puifong.kan@colorado.edu.
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Language
Article   |   June 01, 2010
Word Learning in Children With Primary Language Impairment: A Meta-Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2010, Vol. 53, 739-756. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0248)
History: Received December 1, 2008 , Accepted September 22, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2010, Vol. 53, 739-756. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0248)
History: Received December 1, 2008; Accepted September 22, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 39

PurposeThe present study is a meta-analysis that examines the difference in novel word learning performance between children with primary language impairment (LI) and typically developing children. Participant and task characteristics were examined as variables that potentially moderated children’s word learning.

MethodEight hundred and forty-six published studies were retrieved from conventional databases (PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and Web of Science). Of these studies, 28 met the criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis, yielding 244 effect sizes across experimental conditions.

ResultsLI groups showed significantly lower word learning performance than typical age-matched groups and equivalent performance to typical language–matched groups. Moderator analyses showed that the magnitude of the group difference relative to age peers was significantly associated with participants' chronological age, receptive language and cognitive abilities, task and novel word type, and the extent of novel word exposure.

ConclusionThe difference in novel word learning performance between children with LI and age-matched children is strongly affected by task and participant characteristics in the primary studies.

Acknowledgments
This research began while the first author was a doctoral student in the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Funding for the analysis portion of this article was provided by the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder.
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