The Development and Utilization of a Scale to Measure Adolescents' Attitudes Toward Peers Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices PurposeStudy 1 developed the Assessment of Attitudes Toward Augmentative and Alternative Communication—2 (AATAAC–2) to assess adolescents' attitudes toward peers who use AAC. Study 2 used the AATAAC–2 to examine influences of familiarity with people with disabilities; type of AAC device; and various combinations of gender of rater, AAC user, and ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2010
The Development and Utilization of a Scale to Measure Adolescents' Attitudes Toward Peers Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann R. Beck
    Illinois State University, Normal, IL
  • James R. Thompson
    Illinois State University, Normal, IL
  • Kullaya Kosuwan
    Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Jessica M. Prochnow
    Illinois Neurological Institute, Peoria
  • Contact author: Ann R. Beck, 4100 College of Arts and Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4100. E-mail: arbeck@ilstu.edu.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Speech
Article   |   June 01, 2010
The Development and Utilization of a Scale to Measure Adolescents' Attitudes Toward Peers Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2010, Vol. 53, 572-587. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0140)
History: Received June 28, 2007 , Revised February 1, 2008 , Accepted September 14, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2010, Vol. 53, 572-587. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0140)
History: Received June 28, 2007; Revised February 1, 2008; Accepted September 14, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeStudy 1 developed the Assessment of Attitudes Toward Augmentative and Alternative Communication—2 (AATAAC–2) to assess adolescents' attitudes toward peers who use AAC. Study 2 used the AATAAC–2 to examine influences of familiarity with people with disabilities; type of AAC device; and various combinations of gender of rater, AAC user, and communication partner on adolescents' attitudes.

MethodIn Study 1, 194 adolescents viewed videotapes depicting adolescents using AAC, then completed AATAAC–2. Study 2 utilized 8 videotapes depicting 4 different gender combinations of AAC user and communication partner as experimental stimuli. Each gender combination was filmed twice: once with a static touch screen device, and once with a dynamic touch screen device. One-hundred thirty-six adolescents were randomly assigned to view 1 of the 8 videos. Participants then completed AATAAC–2.

ResultsStudy 1 demonstrated that AATAAC–2 has adequate psychometric properties. Raters' responses in Study 2 indicated no main effect of device type; girls were more positive than boys; and familiarity with peers with disabilities was associated with more positive attitudes. No 2-way interactions were significant; 3-way interaction of level of familiarity, gender, and type of device used was significant.

ConclusionsFamiliarity and gender contribute to adolescents' attitudes; type of AAC device combined with these factors to influence attitudes.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on a master’s thesis completed by the fourth author and a doctoral dissertation completed by the third author. The first and second authors served as first and second reader, respectively, for the thesis and as co-directors of the dissertation. All researchers thank the students, parents, and educators who made the collection of the data possible.
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