Article  |   April 2010
The Internal Validity and Acceptability of the Danish SI-3: A Language-Screening Instrument for 3-Year-Olds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dorthe Bleses
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense
  • Werner Vach
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense
  • Rune N. Jørgensen
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense
  • Torben Worm
    Mikro Værkstedet A/S, Odense, Denmark
  • Contact author: Dorthe Bleses, Center for Child Language, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark. E-mail: bleses@sdu.dk.
  • © 2010 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   April 2010
The Internal Validity and Acceptability of the Danish SI-3: A Language-Screening Instrument for 3-Year-Olds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 490-507. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0132)
History: Received July 4, 2008 , Revised December 4, 2008 , Accepted July 6, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 490-507. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0132)
History: Received July 4, 2008; Revised December 4, 2008; Accepted July 6, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose: To document the development of a new parent- and day care–administered screening instrument (the Screening Instrument for 3-Year-Olds [SI-3]) to be used in a newly implemented, educationally motivated population language screening in Denmark. The authors investigated whether the basic principles of the SI-3 were working satisfactorily and studied the acceptability of the instrument.

Method: To examine the general properties of the SI-3, 517 children from a population-based sample were screened with the SI-3 instrument, which assesses various receptive and productive language dimensions on the basis of parental checklists and day care staff–administered structured tests. To examine the acceptability of the SI-3, 2 questionnaires were administered and completed by 291 parents and 135 preschool teachers.

Result: We obtained a distribution with sufficient negative skew to differentiate among children with low scores, and the instrument displayed acceptable psychometric properties for most subscales. Results of the acceptability study suggest that the acceptability of the SI-3 is high among parents and day care staff, which supports a high attendance rate.

Conclusion: The SI-3 captures a variety of language skills and is good at differentiating children in the lower end of the tail; it is thereby suitable for population language screening, although results indicated the need for some revision.

Acknowledgments
The development of the screening instrument was financed by the Ministry of Family and Consumer Affairs. The instrument was developed together with Mikro Værkstedet and University College Capital. In particular, we are grateful for the rewarding collaboration with Hans Månsson and Peter Mikkelsen of University College Capital. Thanks are extended to employees in the participating 18 municipalities, including the day care staff in more than 260 day care centers, and to the parents who filled out the parent checklist. Also thanks to Philip Dale of the University of New Mexico and Larry Fenson of San Diego State University for their consultancy on the construction of the instrument. Finally, we want to express our thanks to Mette Kjær Andersen for her assistance in the preparation of this article.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access