A Preliminary Evaluation of Fast ForWord-Language as an Adjuvant Treatment in Language Intervention PurposeFast ForWord-Language (FFW-L) is designed to enhance children’s processing of auditory–verbal signals and, thus, their ability to learn language. As a preliminary evaluation of this claim, we examined the effects of a 5-week course of FFW-L as an adjuvant treatment with a subsequent 5-week conventional narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) that ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2010
A Preliminary Evaluation of Fast ForWord-Language as an Adjuvant Treatment in Language Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Lizbeth H. Finestack
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Byron J. Gajewski
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Mihai Popescu
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Jeffrey D. Lewine
    Alexian Brothers Medical Center, Elk Grove Village, IL
  • Contact author: Marc E. Fey, Department of Hearing and Speech, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160-7605. E-mail: mfey@kumc.edu.
  • Lizbeth H. Finestack is now at the University of Minnesota.
    Lizbeth H. Finestack is now at the University of Minnesota.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language
Article   |   April 01, 2010
A Preliminary Evaluation of Fast ForWord-Language as an Adjuvant Treatment in Language Intervention
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 430-449. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0225)
History: Received October 28, 2008 , Revised May 14, 2009 , Accepted July 6, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 430-449. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0225)
History: Received October 28, 2008; Revised May 14, 2009; Accepted July 6, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeFast ForWord-Language (FFW-L) is designed to enhance children’s processing of auditory–verbal signals and, thus, their ability to learn language. As a preliminary evaluation of this claim, we examined the effects of a 5-week course of FFW-L as an adjuvant treatment with a subsequent 5-week conventional narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) that targeted narrative comprehension and production and grammatical output.

MethodTwenty-three children 6–8 years of age with language impairments were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 intervention sequences: (a) FFW-L/NBLI, (b) NBLI/FFW-L, or (c) wait/NBLI. We predicted that after both treatment periods, the FFW-L/NBLI group would show greater gains on measures of narrative ability, conversational grammar, and nonword repetition than the other groups.

ResultsAfter the first 5-week study period, the intervention groups, taken together (i.e., FFW-L/NBLI and NBLI/FFW-L), significantly outperformed the no-treatment wait/NBLI group on 2 narrative measures. At the final test period, all 3 groups displayed significant time-related effects on measures of narrative ability, but there were no statistically significant between-groups effects of intervention sequence.

ConclusionsThis preliminary study provides no evidence to support the claim that FFW-L enhances children’s response to a conventional language intervention.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grant R21DC007214. Additional support was provided by NIDCD Grant P30DC005803 and National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Grants P30HD02528, T32HD007489, and P30HD003352. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIDCD, the NICHD, or the National Institutes of Health. We thank Sophie Ambrose, Stephanie Becker, Nadine Devlin, Elizabeth Elliott, Katie Irwin, Britney Jurgensen, Leslie Lefebvre, Steven Long, Josie Row, Mindy Sittner, Shari Sokol, and Peggy Waggoner for their assistance in providing intervention, diagnostic, transcription, and coding services. We are especially grateful to Cindy Lane, Claudia Shannon, Dan Wright, and the speech-language pathologists of U.S. District 500 for their roles in helping us to identify candidate participants for the study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access