Generalized Motor Abilities and Timing Behavior in Children With Specific Language Impairment PurposeTo examine whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) differ from normally developing peers in motor skills, especially those skills related to timing.MethodStandard measures of gross and fine motor development were obtained. Furthermore, finger and hand movements were recorded while children engaged in 4 different timing tasks, including tapping and ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2010
Generalized Motor Abilities and Timing Behavior in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Howard N. Zelaznik
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Lisa Goffman
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Howard N. Zelaznik, Health and Kinesiology, Lambert 800 West Stadium Avenue, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. E-mail: hnzelaz@purdue.edu.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language
Article   |   April 01, 2010
Generalized Motor Abilities and Timing Behavior in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 383-393. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0204)
History: Received October 2, 2008 , Revised March 27, 2009 , Accepted June 11, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 383-393. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0204)
History: Received October 2, 2008; Revised March 27, 2009; Accepted June 11, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 36

PurposeTo examine whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) differ from normally developing peers in motor skills, especially those skills related to timing.

MethodStandard measures of gross and fine motor development were obtained. Furthermore, finger and hand movements were recorded while children engaged in 4 different timing tasks, including tapping and drawing circles in time with a metronome or a visual target. Fourteen children with SLI (age 6 to 8 years) and 14 age-matched peers who were typically developing participated.

ResultsAs expected, children with SLI showed poorer performance on a standardized test of gross and fine motor skill than did their normally developing peers. However, timing skill in the manual domain was equivalent to that seen in typically developing children.

ConclusionsConsistent with earlier findings, relatively poor gross and fine motor performance is observed in children with SLI. Surprisingly, rhythmic timing is spared.

Acknowledgments
This work represents an equal contribution of the two authors. Both authors were involved in all aspects of the project, and jointly wrote the article. This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC04826. The first author was also supported by National Science Foundation Grant ITR 042760. We are grateful to Kelsey Pithoud, Jenn Tsai, Rahul Chakraborty, and Janna Berlin for their wonderful contributions to data collection and analysis.
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