Randomized Comparison of Augmented and Nonaugmented Language Interventions for Toddlers With Developmental Delays and Their Parents Purpose: This study compared the language performance of young children with developmental delays who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 parent-coached language interventions. Differences in performance on augmented and spoken word size and use, vocabulary size, and communication interaction skills were examined.Method: Sixty-eight toddlers with fewer than ... Article
Article  |   April 2010
Randomized Comparison of Augmented and Nonaugmented Language Interventions for Toddlers With Developmental Delays and Their Parents
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • MaryAnn Romski
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Rose A. Sevcik
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Lauren B. Adamson
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Melissa Cheslock
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Ashlyn Smith
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • R. Michael Barker
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Roger Bakeman
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Contact author: MaryAnn Romski, Department of Communication, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4000. E-mail: mromski@gsu.edu.
  • © 2010 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Language Disorders / Language
Article   |   April 2010
Randomized Comparison of Augmented and Nonaugmented Language Interventions for Toddlers With Developmental Delays and Their Parents
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 350-364. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0156)
History: Received August 10, 2008 , Accepted June 1, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 350-364. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0156)
History: Received August 10, 2008; Accepted June 1, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 31

Purpose: This study compared the language performance of young children with developmental delays who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 parent-coached language interventions. Differences in performance on augmented and spoken word size and use, vocabulary size, and communication interaction skills were examined.

Method: Sixty-eight toddlers with fewer than 10 spoken words were randomly assigned to augmented communication input (AC-I), augmented communication output (AC-O), or spoken communication (SC) interventions; 62 children completed the intervention. This trial assessed the children’s symbolic language performance using communication measures from the language transcripts of the 18th and 24th intervention sessions and coding of target vocabulary use.

Results: All children in the AC-O and AC-I intervention groups used augmented and spoken words for the target vocabulary items, whereas children in the SC intervention produced a very small number of spoken words. Vocabulary size was substantially larger for AC-O and AC-I than for SC groups.

Conclusions: This study found that augmented language interventions that include parent coaching have a positive communication effect on young children with developmental delays who begin with fewer than 10 spoken words. Clinical implications suggest that augmented communication does not hinder, and actually aids, speech production abilities in young children with developmental delays.

Acknowledgments
The research was funded by National Institutes of Health Grant DC-03799. Special thanks go to all the families who participated in this study. Earlier versions of this article were presented at the Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in MRDD, San Diego, CA, March 2006, and the biennial meeting of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Dusseldorf, Germany, August 2006. We thank Tanya Kobek, Rebekah Walker, Ramona Blackman Jones, Sara Dowless, Mia Ligon, and Laura Carey for their assistance in implementing the protocols, creating the transcripts, and collecting the data.
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