Preschool Speech, Language Skills, and Reading at 7, 9, and 10 Years: Etiology of the Relationship PurposeTo examine the etiology of the relationship between preschool speech and language, and later reading skills.MethodOne thousand six hundred seventy-two children from the Twins Early Development Study (B. R. Oliver & R. Plomin, 2007) were given a comprehensive speech and language assessment at 4½ years. Reading was assessed at 7, ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2010
Preschool Speech, Language Skills, and Reading at 7, 9, and 10 Years: Etiology of the Relationship
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Marianna A. Hayiou-Thomas, Department of Psychology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom. E-mail: m.hayiou-thomas@psychology.york.ac.uk.
  • Nicole Harlaar is now with The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM.
    Nicole Harlaar is now with The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article   |   April 01, 2010
Preschool Speech, Language Skills, and Reading at 7, 9, and 10 Years: Etiology of the Relationship
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 311-332. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0145)
History: Received July 3, 2007 , Revised January 21, 2009 , Accepted April 15, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 311-332. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0145)
History: Received July 3, 2007; Revised January 21, 2009; Accepted April 15, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

PurposeTo examine the etiology of the relationship between preschool speech and language, and later reading skills.

MethodOne thousand six hundred seventy-two children from the Twins Early Development Study (B. R. Oliver & R. Plomin, 2007) were given a comprehensive speech and language assessment at 4½ years. Reading was assessed at 7, 9, and 10 years. Twin analyses were applied to the data to assess the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the longitudinal relationships between speech and reading, and language and reading.

ResultsPhenotypically, there is a moderate and stable relationship between 4½-year speech and language scores and reading at 7, 9, and 10 years. Etiologically, at the individual-differences level, both genetic and shared environmental factors contribute to the links between language skills and reading. By contrast, genetic factors account for most of the relationship between early speech and later reading. At the extremes, there appears to be an even stronger role for genetic factors in accounting for the prediction from early speech and language impairments to later reading outcome.

ConclusionBoth genetic and environmental factors contribute to the relationship between early language skills and reading, whereas genetic factors play a dominant role in the relationship between early speech and reading.

Acknowledgments
The Twin Early Development Study (TEDS) is supported by Program Grant G0500079 from the U.K. Medical Research Council. We gratefully acknowledge the ongoing contribution of the parents and children in the TEDS.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access