The Effect of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Activity in the Temporal Lobe While Speaking: A Positron Emission Tomography Study PurposeDelayed auditory feedback is a technique that can improve fluency in stutterers, while disrupting fluency in many nonstuttering individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the neural basis for the detection of and compensation for such a delay, and the effects of increases in the delay duration.MethodPositron emission ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2010
The Effect of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Activity in the Temporal Lobe While Speaking: A Positron Emission Tomography Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hideki Takaso
    University College London (UCL), United Kingdom
  • Frank Eisner
    University College London (UCL), United Kingdom
  • Richard J. S. Wise
    Hammersmith Hospital, London
  • Sophie K. Scott
    UCL
  • Contact author: Sophie K. Scott, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom. E-mail: sophie.scott@ucl.ac.uk.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   April 01, 2010
The Effect of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Activity in the Temporal Lobe While Speaking: A Positron Emission Tomography Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 226-236. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/09-0009)
History: Received January 26, 2009 , Revised May 8, 2009 , Accepted October 13, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2010, Vol. 53, 226-236. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/09-0009)
History: Received January 26, 2009; Revised May 8, 2009; Accepted October 13, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 26

PurposeDelayed auditory feedback is a technique that can improve fluency in stutterers, while disrupting fluency in many nonstuttering individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the neural basis for the detection of and compensation for such a delay, and the effects of increases in the delay duration.

MethodPositron emission tomography was used to image regional cerebral blood flow changes, an index of neural activity, and to assess the influence of increasing amounts of delay.

ResultsDelayed auditory feedback led to increased activation in the bilateral superior temporal lobes, extending into posterior-medial auditory areas. Similar peaks in the temporal lobe were sensitive to increases in the amount of delay. A single peak in the temporal parietal junction responded to the amount of delay but not to the presence of a delay (relative to no delay).

ConclusionsThis study permitted distinctions to be made between the neural response to hearing one’s voice at a delay and the neural activity that correlates with this delay. Notably, all the peaks showed some influence of the amount of delay. This result confirms a role for the posterior, sensorimotor “how” system in the production of speech under conditions of delayed auditory feedback.

Acknowledgments
Frank Eisner and Sophie K. Scott were supported by Wellcome Trust SRF Award WT074414MA to Sophie K. Scott. Hideki Takaso and Frank Eisner contributed equally to this study.
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