Subtypes of Severe Speech and Language Impairments Psychometric Evidence From 4-Year-Old Children in the Netherlands Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2004
Subtypes of Severe Speech and Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John van Daal
    University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Ludo Verhoeven
    University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Hans van Balkom
    University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: j.v.daal@sintmarie.nl
  • Contact author: John van Daal, kon. Wilhelminalaan 45, 5583 Al Waalre, The Netherlands.
    Contact author: John van Daal, kon. Wilhelminalaan 45, 5583 Al Waalre, The Netherlands.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2004
Subtypes of Severe Speech and Language Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1411-1423. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/105)
History: Received October 24, 2002 , Revised June 26, 2003 , Accepted April 30, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1411-1423. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/105)
History: Received October 24, 2002; Revised June 26, 2003; Accepted April 30, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

Most, if not all, of the studies of subtypes of children with language impairments have been conducted with English-speaking children. The possibility and validity of identified subtypes for non-English clinical populations are, as yet, unknown. This study was designed to provide cross-linguistic evidence of language subtypes. A broad battery of tests was administered to measure the phonological, lexical, morphosyntactic, semantic, discourse, and pragmatic abilities of a representative sample of 110 4-year-old Dutch children who had been previously diagnosed as severely speech and language impaired. Principal components analyses revealed 4 subtypes of speech and language impairments, which were labeled lexical-semantic, speech production, syntactic-sequential, and auditory perception. These results were consistent with recent theoretical claims about the classification of English-speaking children with speech and language impairments.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a research grant from the VeBOSS, the Dutch society for schools that provide special education for children with severe speech and language impairments in the Netherlands. Financial support was also received from two institutions in the Netherlands for children with communication problems: Sint Marie in Eindhoven and Viataal (the former Institute for the Deaf) in Sint Michielsgestel. We would like to thank the psychologists and speech-language pathologists who tested the children and Lee Ann Weeks for editing the text of this article.
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