Tense and Agreement in the Speech of Children With Specific Language Impairment Patterns of Generalization Through Intervention Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2004
Tense and Agreement in the Speech of Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Stephen M. Camarata
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Barbara Brown
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Mary N. Camarata
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: xdxl@purdue.edu
  • Contact author: Laurence B. Leonard, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
    Contact author: Laurence B. Leonard, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2004
Tense and Agreement in the Speech of Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1363-1379. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/102)
History: Received December 12, 2003 , Accepted April 25, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1363-1379. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/102)
History: Received December 12, 2003; Accepted April 25, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 45

Thirty-one children with specific language impairment participated in 48 intervention sessions designed to assist them in the use of 3rd-person singular - s or auxiliary is/are/was. Gains in the use of these target forms were significantly greater than gains on developmentally comparable morphemes serving as control forms. Untreated verb forms that mark both tense and agreement showed greater change during the intervention period than did past - ed. The findings suggest that by gaining skill in the use of morphemes that mark both tense and agreement, the children were able to identify and acquire other morphemes in the language that mark both of these features. This increase in sensitivity did not appear to apply to forms in the language that express tense only.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this paper was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC04544. We thank Meghan Fitzgerald and Wenonah Campbell for their extremely valuable help in creating the stories used in the intervention sessions and for their assistance in devising appropriate scoring forms. We also thank Catherine Bush and Jill Omer for their skill in organization, record-keeping, and clinician training. A special thanks also to Sonja Solomonson for assisting with a range of duties. We are also grateful to the following individuals who served as clinicians, assistants during assessment, or transcribers: Whitney Boone, Emily Durnil, Katie Camarata, Rholanda Cleveland, Angie Fontenot, Tara Robinson, Kate Kardel, Vanessa Smith, Katie Woodworth, Amy Hanrahan, Elly Huskey, Marlo Mewherter, Cindy Shamburger, Gretchen Melpolder, Deb Riley, Kristen Witte, Darcy Kazarian, Stephanie Cotton, Martha Levien, Sharon Murphy, Dana Gombus, Courtney Copeland, Michelle Stoller, and Christine Frazier.
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