Auditory Temporal Pattern Discrimination and Reading Ability The relation between reading ability and performance on an auditory temporal pattern discrimination task was investigated in children who were either good or delayed readers. The stimuli in the primary task consisted of sequences of tones, alternating between high and low frequencies. The threshold interstimulus interval (ISI) for discrimination of ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2004
Auditory Temporal Pattern Discrimination and Reading Ability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ken I. McAnally
    University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Anne Castles
    University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Susan Bannister
    University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: ken.mcanally@dsto.defence.gov.au
  • Contact author: Ken McAnally, Air Operations Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, P.O. Box 4331, Melbourne 3001, Victoria, Australia.
    Contact author: Ken McAnally, Air Operations Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, P.O. Box 4331, Melbourne 3001, Victoria, Australia.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 2004
Auditory Temporal Pattern Discrimination and Reading Ability
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1237-1243. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/093)
History: Received December 11, 2002 , Accepted March 17, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1237-1243. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/093)
History: Received December 11, 2002; Accepted March 17, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

The relation between reading ability and performance on an auditory temporal pattern discrimination task was investigated in children who were either good or delayed readers. The stimuli in the primary task consisted of sequences of tones, alternating between high and low frequencies. The threshold interstimulus interval (ISI) for discrimination of differences in the temporal properties of the sequences was measured. An ISI threshold was also measured in a control task that was identical to the primary task, except all tones in a control sequence had the same frequency. Delayed readers and good readers were equally able to discriminate the timing of the sequences at short ISIs, for both the primary and control tasks. Furthermore, the ISI thresholds were not correlated with the ability to read either irregular words or nonwords. These results suggest that reading ability is not related to the ability to track large and rapid frequency changes in auditory temporal patterns.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grant A10020906 from the Australian Research Council. The authors thank Tracey Holt and Adam McKay for assistance with some of the data collection. We also thank two anonymous reviewers for their comments.
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