Speech Intelligibility of Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients With 7 Years of Device Experience Speech intelligibility of 24 prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients with 84 months of device experience was investigated. Each CI participant's speech samples were judged by a panel of 3 listeners. Intelligibility scores were calculated as the average of the 3 listeners' responses. The average write-down intelligibility score was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2004
Speech Intelligibility of Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients With 7 Years of Device Experience
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shu-Chen Peng
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Linda J. Spencer
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: shu-chen-peng@uiowa.edu
  • Contact author: Shu-Chen Peng, MA, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1012.
    Contact author: Shu-Chen Peng, MA, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1012.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 01, 2004
Speech Intelligibility of Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients With 7 Years of Device Experience
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1227-1236. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/092)
History: Received June 20, 2003 , Accepted April 5, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2004, Vol. 47, 1227-1236. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/092)
History: Received June 20, 2003; Accepted April 5, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 41

Speech intelligibility of 24 prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients with 84 months of device experience was investigated. Each CI participant's speech samples were judged by a panel of 3 listeners. Intelligibility scores were calculated as the average of the 3 listeners' responses. The average write-down intelligibility score was 71.54% (SD = 29.89), and the average rating-scale intelligibility score was 3.03 points (SD = 1.01). Write-down and rating-scale intelligibility scores were highly correlated (r = .91, p<.001). Linear regression analyses revealed that both age at implantation and different speech-coding strategies contribute to the variability of CI participants' speech intelligibility. Implantation at a younger age and the use of the spectral-peak speech-coding strategy yielded higher intelligibility scores than implantation at an older age and the use of the multipeak speech-coding strategy. These results serve as indices for clinical applications when long-term advancements in spoken-language development are considered for pediatric CI recipients.

Acknowledgments
An earlier version of this article was presented at the Ninth Symposium on Cochlear Implants in Children, Washington, DC, April 2003. This work was supported by Grant 2 P50 DC00242 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Grant RR00059 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program of the National Institutes of Health, and The Iowa Lions Sight and Hearing Foundation. We appreciate the participation of all CI recipients and their families, as well as the 72 listeners in this study. We also gratefully acknowledge the help from Brittan Barker, Chris Turner, and Richard Hurtig to set up our listening tasks. Our sincere thanks also go to Patricia Spencer (Gallaudet University), who provided us with useful suggestions in our pilot study. We appreciate the assistance of Jillian Evans in conducting listening tasks. Thanks are due also to Nelson Lu for his valuable suggestions on the experimental design and statistical analysis.
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