Learning of Dynamic Display AAC Technologies by Typically Developing 3-Year-Olds Effect of Different Layouts and Menu Approaches Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2004
Learning of Dynamic Display AAC Technologies by Typically Developing 3-Year-Olds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn D. R. Drager
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Janice C. Light
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Rhonda Carlson
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Karen D'Silva
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Brittany Larsson
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Laura Pitkin
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Gini Stopper
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: kdd5@psu.edu
  • Kathryn D. R. Drager, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802. E-mail: kdd5@psu.edu
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2004
Learning of Dynamic Display AAC Technologies by Typically Developing 3-Year-Olds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2004, Vol. 47, 1133-1148. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/084)
History: Received March 19, 2003 , Accepted January 5, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2004, Vol. 47, 1133-1148. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/084)
History: Received March 19, 2003; Accepted January 5, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

The present study investigated the learning demands of dynamic display augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technologies that differed in system layout and menu page approaches for 3-year-old children. Ten typically developing children were randomly assigned to each of 3 technology approaches and were asked to located vocabulary items within a play context. Results indicated that the children had difficulty with all of the technologies on initial exposure. After the 1st learning session, children performed significantly better with AAC technologies in a contextual scene format than in a grid format. Some limited generalization to new vocabulary was evident. AAC technologies for young children need to be redesigned to better reflect the developmental models of children. Results are discussed with implications for practice and suggestions for future research.

Acknowledgments
This article is based in part on a presentation at the Ninth International Conference of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Washington, DC, August 2000. This research is part of the Communication Enhancement Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (AAC-RERC), which is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the U.S. Department of Education under Grant H133E980026. The opinions contained in this publication are those of the grantee and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Education. Additional information on the AAC-RERC is available at http://www.aac-rerc.org/
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