Effects of Speech and Print Feedback on Spelling by Children With Autism In this systematic replication of a previous study (R. W. Schlosser, D. M. Blischak, P. J. Belfiore, C. Bartley, & N. Barnett, 1998), the effects of speech and print feedback on spelling performance were evaluated. Four children with autism and no functional speech were taught to spell words with a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2004
Effects of Speech and Print Feedback on Spelling by Children With Autism
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ralf W. Schlosser
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA
  • Doreen M. Blischak
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: r.schlosser@neu.edu
  • Contact author: Ralf W. Schlosser, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology, Northeastern University, 151B Forsyth, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: r.schlosser@neu.edu
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2004
Effects of Speech and Print Feedback on Spelling by Children With Autism
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2004, Vol. 47, 848-862. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/063)
History: Received April 6, 2003 , Revised July 28, 2003 , Accepted November 29, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2004, Vol. 47, 848-862. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/063)
History: Received April 6, 2003; Revised July 28, 2003; Accepted November 29, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

In this systematic replication of a previous study (R. W. Schlosser, D. M. Blischak, P. J. Belfiore, C. Bartley, & N. Barnett, 1998), the effects of speech and print feedback on spelling performance were evaluated. Four children with autism and no functional speech were taught to spell words with a speech-generating device under 3 feedback conditions. In the auditory-visual condition, children received both speech and print feedback, whereas in the auditory and visual conditions, only 1 type of feedback was provided. An adapted alternating treatments design was used. All 4 children reached criterion across conditions. Although 3 children reached criterion first with print or speech-print feedback, 1 child was most efficient with speech-print followed by speech feedback. Based on the findings of both studies, 2 distinct profiles of feedback efficiency are proposed. Children that exemplify the primarily visual profile spell words most efficiently when feedback involves print. Children that fit the auditory profile spell words most efficiently when feedback involves speech. The implications for understanding the learning characteristics of children with autism, as well as those for practice and further research are derived.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by U.S. Department of Education Grant H327A990029.
We wish to thank Jocelyn Hendrickson, Elizabeth von Euw, and Robbin Zschau for their assistance in data collection, and Dale Hoidalen for her help in data analysis and manuscript preparation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access