Preserved Morphological Decomposition in Persons With Alzheimer's Disease Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) demonstrate a severe lexical impairment that affects conceptual knowledge. Research into aspects of word structure and the structural relationships between words, however, has been scarce in this population. Taking advantage of the rich morphology of Hebrew, the current article examines the status of morphological decomposition ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2004
Preserved Morphological Decomposition in Persons With Alzheimer's Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gitit Kavé
    The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Yonata Levy
    The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: gkave@012.net.il
  • Contact author: Gitit Kavé, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, Tel Aviv University, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel 52621. E-mail: gkave@012.net.il
  • Currently at the Department of Communication Disorders, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Currently at the Department of Communication Disorders, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2004
Preserved Morphological Decomposition in Persons With Alzheimer's Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2004, Vol. 47, 835-847. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/062)
History: Received June 19, 2003 , Accepted November 23, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2004, Vol. 47, 835-847. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/062)
History: Received June 19, 2003; Accepted November 23, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) demonstrate a severe lexical impairment that affects conceptual knowledge. Research into aspects of word structure and the structural relationships between words, however, has been scarce in this population. Taking advantage of the rich morphology of Hebrew, the current article examines the status of morphological decomposition in AD. Fourteen persons with AD and 48 control participants completed 2 experiments: The 1st investigated root extraction from pseudoverbs containing existing and nonexisting consonantal roots, and the 2nd looked at sensitivity to morphological priming effects. Results suggest that despite severe semantic-conceptual deficits on naming, fluency, and comprehension tasks, persons with AD engage in adequate morphological decomposition of words, in a similar manner to normal adult speakers of Hebrew.

Acknowledgments
This work was conducted in partial fulfillment of the degree of doctor of philosophy at the Hebrew University, by Gitit Kavé. It was supported by doctoral grants from the Brookdale Institute of Gerontology and Human Development and Eshel–The Association for the Planning and Development of Services for the Aged in Israel, as well as by a grant from the Israel Foundation’s trustees. We thank Maya Marcus for her help in collecting the data.
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