Separating Contributions of Hearing, Lexical Knowledge, and Speech Production to Speech-Perception Scores in Children With Hearing Impairments Open-set word and sentence speech-perception test scores are commonly used as a measure of hearing abilities in children and adults using cochlear implants and/or hearing aids. These tests are usually presented auditorily with a verbal response. In the case of children, scores are typically lower and more variable than for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2004
Separating Contributions of Hearing, Lexical Knowledge, and Speech Production to Speech-Perception Scores in Children With Hearing Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Louise E. Paatsch
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
  • Peter J. Blamey
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
  • Julia Z. Sarant
    The Bionic Ear Institute, Melbourne, Australia
  • Lois F. A. Martin
    The Bionic Ear Institute, Melbourne, Australia
  • Catherine P. Bow
    The University of Melbourne
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: l.paatsch@unimelb.edu.au
  • Contact author: Louise E. Paatsch, MEd, Department of Learning and Educational Development, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. E-mail:l.paatsch@unimelb.edu.au
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2004
Separating Contributions of Hearing, Lexical Knowledge, and Speech Production to Speech-Perception Scores in Children With Hearing Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2004, Vol. 47, 738-750. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/056)
History: Received June 10, 2002 , Revised November 5, 2002 , Accepted January 13, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2004, Vol. 47, 738-750. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/056)
History: Received June 10, 2002; Revised November 5, 2002; Accepted January 13, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Open-set word and sentence speech-perception test scores are commonly used as a measure of hearing abilities in children and adults using cochlear implants and/or hearing aids. These tests are usually presented auditorily with a verbal response. In the case of children, scores are typically lower and more variable than for adults with hearing impairments using similar devices. It is difficult to interpret children’s speech-perception scores without considering the effects of lexical knowledge and speech-production abilities on their responses. This study postulated a simple mathematical model to describe the effects of hearing, lexical knowledge, and speech production on the perception test scores for monosyllabic words by children with impaired hearing. Thirty-three primary-school children with impaired hearing, fitted with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants, were evaluated using speech-perception, reading-aloud, speech-production, and language measures. These various measures were incorporated in the mathematical model, which revealed that performance in an open-set word-perception test in the auditory-alone mode is strongly dependent on residual hearing levels, lexical knowledge, and speech-production abilities. Further applications of the model provided an estimate of the effect of each component on the overall speech-perception score for each child.

Acknowledgments
We wish to acknowledge the children, parents, and staff of Mountview Primary School and St. Mary’s School for Children with Impaired Hearing for their cooperation and assistance in the collection of data. We also gratefully acknowledge the work of Johanna Barry, who assisted in the transcription of responses from the assessments referred to in this study. Roger Wales provided encouragement and constructive commentary on the development of nonlinear models for speech perception. Financial support for the study was provided by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant 970257 and Research Fellowship 208998.
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