Language Performance in Chronic Schizophrenia A Pragmatic Approach Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2004
Language Performance in Chronic Schizophrenia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sara R. Meilijson
    Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Asa Kasher
    Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Avner Elizur
    Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2004
Language Performance in Chronic Schizophrenia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 695-713. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/053)
History: Received February 7, 2003 , Accepted December 5, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 695-713. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/053)
History: Received February 7, 2003; Accepted December 5, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 31

In this study, the authors examined the language of 43 participants with chronic schizophrenia under the basic assumption that a paradigmatic shift is needed in the methodology used to investigate the language of schizophrenia. The pragmatic protocol (C. Prutting & D. Kirchner, 1987) was chosen as the method of analysis to attain a general profile of pragmatic abilities. The results showed that the participants with schizophrenia exhibited a high degree of inappropriate pragmatic abilities compared to participants with mixed anxiety-depression disorder and participants with hemispheric brain damage, as previously assessed by Prutting and Kirchner. Statistical methods for clustering analysis yielded 5 distinct parameter clusters: Topic, Speech Acts, Turn-Taking, Lexical, and Nonverbal. Group clustering analysis of the 43 participants with schizophrenia produced 3 distinct groups with different profiles: minimal impairment, lexical impairment, and interactional impairment. The results are discussed in terms of theoretical implications in the area of pragmatics, the diagnosis of schizophrenia, and other goals.

Acknowledgments
This article is part of Sara Meilijson’s PhD thesis at Tel Aviv University, written under the guidance of the other authors.
We express sincere thanks to Eran Zaidel for his insightful assistance throughout Sara Meilijson’s thesis research. Special thanks to Ilana Gelernter, Isaac Meilijson, and the Statistical Laboratory at Tel Aviv University for all phases of the statistical analysis. Our gratitude extends to the staff of the Abarbanel, Shalwatta, and Raanana Mental Health Centers, who assisted us in locating and approaching participants. We wish to express our special appreciation and gratitude to the participants who volunteered to participate in this study.
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