Prelinguistic Predictors of Language Growth in Children With Developmental Disabilities This study followed 18 children with developmental disabilities, whose chronological ages were between 3 years and 6 years at the start of the study, over a 2-year period. At initial observation, children communicated primarily through prelinguistic gestures, vocalizations, and single-word utterances. Children's language skills were measured every 6 months with ... Article/Report
Article/Report  |   June 2004
Prelinguistic Predictors of Language Growth in Children With Developmental Disabilities
 
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: nbrady@ku.edu
  • ¬©American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Language
Article/Report   |   June 2004
Prelinguistic Predictors of Language Growth in Children With Developmental Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 663-677. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/051)
History: Received May 1, 2003 , Accepted October 20, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 663-677. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/051)
History: Received May 1, 2003; Accepted October 20, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 40

This study followed 18 children with developmental disabilities, whose chronological ages were between 3 years and 6 years at the start of the study, over a 2-year period. At initial observation, children communicated primarily through prelinguistic gestures, vocalizations, and single-word utterances. Children's language skills were measured every 6 months with the Sequenced Inventory of Communication Development-Revised (D. E. Hedrick, E. M. Prather, & A. R. Tobin, 1984). Prelinguistic communication rate and parental responsiveness were also measured at each observation. Development of language over time differed between participants in accordance with their entry-level communication. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that children's level of gestural attainment, rate of communication, and parent response contingency were significant predictors of language outcome.

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