The Relationship Between Social Behavior and Severity of Language Impairment The Teacher Behavior Rating Scale (C. H. Hart & C. C. Robinson, 1996) was used to compare the withdrawn and sociable behaviors of 41 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 41 typically developing peers. Three subtypes of withdrawal (reticence, solitary-active, solitary-passive) and 2 subtypes of sociable behavior (prosocial, impulse ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2004
The Relationship Between Social Behavior and Severity of Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kerstine I. Hart
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Craig H. Hart
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: martin_fujiki@byu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2004
The Relationship Between Social Behavior and Severity of Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 647-662. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/050)
History: Received April 24, 2003 , Accepted October 19, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 647-662. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/050)
History: Received April 24, 2003; Accepted October 19, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 63

The Teacher Behavior Rating Scale (C. H. Hart & C. C. Robinson, 1996) was used to compare the withdrawn and sociable behaviors of 41 children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 41 typically developing peers. Three subtypes of withdrawal (reticence, solitary-active, solitary-passive) and 2 subtypes of sociable behavior (prosocial, impulse control/likeability) were examined. Teachers rated children with SLI as exhibiting higher levels of reticence and solitary-passive withdrawal than typical children. Teachers also rated the children with SLI as demonstrating lower levels of both types of sociable behavior than typical children. The group with SLI was then separated into subgroups of children having more severe and less severe language impairment. These groupings did not differ on comparisons involving withdrawn behavior, except that girls with more severe receptive problems demonstrated higher levels of solitary-passive withdrawal than did girls with less severe language problems. Children with less severe receptive language impairment demonstrated higher levels of proficiency on both types of sociable behavior than their peers with more severe impairment. Children with more severe expressive problems also demonstrated poorer prosocial behavior—but not poorer impulse control/likeability—than children with less severe expressive problems.

KEY WORDS: social skills, language impairment, socioemotional, withdrawal, social competence

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant from the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. We acknowledge the expert statistical consultation provided by Chongming Yang, School of Family Life, Brigham Young University. We also thank Rebecca Garda, Allen Gurney, Jean Gunn, Lisa Higbee, Janet Howe, Kristi Kitchen, Emily Larsen, Michele Lundell, Elizabeth Nealson, Kris Oleson, Ginger Pierce, Debbie Taggart, and Kristine Tanner for their assistance in participant identification. Finally, we acknowledge Annette Jerome for her contributions to this work, as well as Shelley Burton, Diane Clarke, and Shane James, who worked as research assistants on this project.
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