The Relationship of Language and Emotion Regulation Skills to Reticence in Children With Specific Language Impairment This study examined the relationship between emotion regulation, language ability, and reticent behavior in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their typical peers. Participants included 43 children with SLI and 43 typically developing children, for a total sample of 86 participants. Children were selected from 2 age ranges: 5–8 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2004
The Relationship of Language and Emotion Regulation Skills to Reticence in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Matthew P. Spackman
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Andrea Hall
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Martin_Fujiki@byu.edu
  • Martin Fujiki, PhD, Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Brigham Young University, 130 TLRB, Provo, UT 84602-1241. E-mail: Martin_Fujiki@byu.edu
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2004
The Relationship of Language and Emotion Regulation Skills to Reticence in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 637-646. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/049)
History: Received June 24, 2003 , Accepted October 19, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 637-646. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/049)
History: Received June 24, 2003; Accepted October 19, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 41

This study examined the relationship between emotion regulation, language ability, and reticent behavior in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their typical peers. Participants included 43 children with SLI and 43 typically developing children, for a total sample of 86 participants. Children were selected from 2 age ranges: 5–8 years and 9–12 years. The Emotion Regulation Checklist (ERC; A. Shields & D. Cicchetti, 1997, 1998) and the Teacher Behavior Rating Scale (TBRS; C. H. Hart & C. C. Robinson, 1996) were completed by each child’s teacher to provide measures of emotion regulation and reticence, respectively. The Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language (CASL; E. Carrow-Woodfolk, 1999) was administered to provide a measure of language ability. A regression analysis including all participants indicated that the emotion regulation scores and the CASL scores were significant predictors of the reticence scores, accounting for 43% of the variance. Group-specific analyses were then conducted to determine whether the 2 predictor scales differentially predicted reticence based on language and age groups. None of the tests exceeded the.05 level, indicating that there was no significant difference in predictive power on the 2 factors in question.

KEY WORDS: emotion regulation, language impairment, reticence, withdrawal, socioemotional

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant from the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. We thank Ann Shields for use of the Emotion Regulation Checklist and Craig Hart for use of the Teacher Behavior Rating Scale.We express our gratitude to Jayna Collingridge, Ann Dorais, Rebecca Garda, Jean Gunn, Laura Harris, Lisa Higbee, Janet Howe, Ana Mattson, Kristen Norris, Kris Olesen, Ginger Pierce, Judy Roberts, Michelle Smith, and Debbie Taggart for their assistance in participant identification. Finally, we acknowledge Donna Nelson, Jill Allen, Jessica Berg, and Jennifer George for their work as research assistants on this project.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access