Simulation of Aphasic Naming Performance in Non-Brain-Damaged Adults Discussion abounds in the literature as to whether aphasia is a deficit of linguistic competence or linguistic performance and, if it is a performance deficit, what are its precise mechanisms. Considerable evidence suggests that alteration of nonlinguistic factors can affect language performance in aphasia, a finding that raises questions about ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2004
Simulation of Aphasic Naming Performance in Non-Brain-Damaged Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • JoAnn P. Silkes
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Mathias Drton
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jsilkes@u.washington.edu
  • Contact author:JoAnn Silkes, MS, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105-6246. E-mail: jsilkes@u.washington.edu
  • Currently at the University of Washington.
    Currently at the University of Washington.×
  • Currently at the University of Pittsburgh and at the VA Pittsburgh Health Care System.
    Currently at the University of Pittsburgh and at the VA Pittsburgh Health Care System.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2004
Simulation of Aphasic Naming Performance in Non-Brain-Damaged Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 610-623. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/047)
History: Received September 3, 2002 , Accepted September 20, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 610-623. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/047)
History: Received September 3, 2002; Accepted September 20, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Discussion abounds in the literature as to whether aphasia is a deficit of linguistic competence or linguistic performance and, if it is a performance deficit, what are its precise mechanisms. Considerable evidence suggests that alteration of nonlinguistic factors can affect language performance in aphasia, a finding that raises questions about the modularity of language and the purity of linguistic mechanisms underlying the putative language deficits in persons with aphasia. This study investigated whether temporal stress plus additional cognitive demands placed on non-brain-damaged adults would produce aphasic-like performance on a picture naming task. Two groups of non-brain-damaged participants completed a picture naming task with additional cognitive demands (use of low frequency words and making semantic judgments about the stimuli). A control group performed this task at their own pace, and an experimental group was placed under time constraints. Naming errors were identified and coded by error type. Errors made by individuals with aphasia from a previous study (S. E. Kohn & H. Goodglass, 1985) were recoded with the coding system used in the present study and were then compared with the types of errors produced by the 2 non-brain-damaged groups. Results generally support the hypothesis that the language performance deficits seen in persons with aphasia exist on a continuum with the language performance of non-brain-damaged individuals. Some error type differences between groups warrant further investigation.

KEY WORDS: aphasia, language functions and disorders, anomia, verbal expression

Acknowledgments
This work was completed as a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an MS in Communicative Disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. We are grateful to Harold Goodglass and Susan Kohn for their invaluable contribution of data. We thank Keith Kuhlemeier and the staff of the Trace Research and Development Center for their assistance with various aspects of the project. We are grateful to Gary Weismer and Margaret Lemme for their assistance and encouragement throughout the process and to Margaret Rogers for editorial assistance and constructive insight in preparation of the manuscript.
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