Problem Behaviors of Low-Income Children With Language Delays An Observation Study Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2004
Problem Behaviors of Low-Income Children With Language Delays
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathy Huaqing Qi
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Ann P. Kaiser
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: cqi@wcupa.edu
  • Currently affiliated with West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, PA.
    Currently affiliated with West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, PA.×
Article Information
Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2004
Problem Behaviors of Low-Income Children With Language Delays
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 595-609. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/046)
History: Received May 24, 2003 , Accepted September 14, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 595-609. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/046)
History: Received May 24, 2003; Accepted September 14, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

Children from low-income families are at increased risk for significant behavioral and language problems. Early identification of these problems is essential for effective intervention. The purpose of the present study was to use multiple behavioral assessments to examine the behavioral profiles of sixty 3- and 4-year-old children from low-income families enrolled in Head Start programs and to compare the behavior characteristics of 32 children with language delays with those of 28 children with typical language development. Teachers completed the Child Behavior Checklist/Caregiver-Teacher Report Form/2–5 (CTRF; T. M. Achenbach, 1997) and the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS; F. M. Gresham & S. N. Elliott, 1990), and children were observed in the classrooms during structured and unstructured activities. Children with language delays exhibited more problem behaviors and poorer social skills on some of the observational measures than did children with typical language development, as predicted, but not on all.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grants 90YD0086 and 90YM002 from the Administration on Children, Youth, and Families and by Grant RO1MH54629 from the National Institute of Mental Health. We extend our appreciation to the families who participated in the study for their cooperation and to the Metropolitan Action Commission and Head Start Program for its continuing partnership in our research.
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