Relations Among Linguistic and Cognitive Skills and Spoken Word Recognition in Adults With Cochlear Implants This study examined spoken word recognition in adults with cochlear implants (CIs) to determine the extent to which linguistic and cognitive abilities predict variability in speech-perception performance. Both a traditional consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC)-repetition measure and a gated-word recognition measure (F. Grosjean, 1996) were used. Stimuli in the gated-word-recognition task varied in ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   June 01, 2004
Relations Among Linguistic and Cognitive Skills and Spoken Word Recognition in Adults With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth A. Collison
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Benjamin Munson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Arlene Earley Carney
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: munso005@umn.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.
    Currently affiliated with the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2004
Relations Among Linguistic and Cognitive Skills and Spoken Word Recognition in Adults With Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 496-508. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/039)
History: Received February 3, 2003 , Accepted December 11, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2004, Vol. 47, 496-508. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/039)
History: Received February 3, 2003; Accepted December 11, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

This study examined spoken word recognition in adults with cochlear implants (CIs) to determine the extent to which linguistic and cognitive abilities predict variability in speech-perception performance. Both a traditional consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC)-repetition measure and a gated-word recognition measure (F. Grosjean, 1996) were used. Stimuli in the gated-word-recognition task varied in neighborhood density. Adults with CIs repeated CVC words less accurately than did age-matched adults with normal hearing sensitivity (NH). In addition, adults with CIs required more acoustic information to recognize gated words than did adults with NH. Neighborhood density had a smaller influence on gated-word recognition by adults with CIs than on recognition by adults with NH. With the exception of 1 outlying participant, standardized, norm-referenced measures of cognitive and linguistic abilities were not correlated with word-recognition measures. Taken together, these results do not support the hypothesis that cognitive and linguistic abilities predict variability in speech-perception performance in a heterogeneous group of adults with CIs. Findings are discussed in light of the potential role of auditory perception in mediating relations among cognitive and linguistic skill and spoken word recognition.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this article were completed as the first author’s master’s thesis in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Minnesota, under the codirection of the second and third authors. This project was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders grant P01 DC00110, the Lions 5M International Hearing Foundation, and the Bryng Bryngelson Fund in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Minnesota. We thank Gail Donaldson, Peggy Nelson, and Herbert Pick for their useful comments on this work. We also acknowledge Edward Carney, Nancy DeBoe, Suzanne Hansel, Heather Kreft, Shayla Manthei, Ruth Miller, and Cyndie Swenson for assistance in participant recruitment, experiment design, data collection, and data analysis.
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