Semantic Features in Fast-Mapping Performance of Preschoolers With Specific Language Impairment Versus Preschoolers With Normal Language Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2004
Semantic Features in Fast-Mapping
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Alt
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Elena Plante
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Marlena Creusere
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: malt@u.arizona.edu
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2004
Semantic Features in Fast-Mapping
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2004, Vol. 47, 407-420. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/033)
History: Received February 14, 2003 , Accepted July 14, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2004, Vol. 47, 407-420. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/033)
History: Received February 14, 2003; Accepted July 14, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 66

This study examined the receptive language skills of young children (4–6 years old) with specific language impairment (SLI). Specifically, the authors looked at their ability to fast-map semantic features of objects and actions and compared it to the performance of age-matched peers with normally developing language (NL). Children completed a computer task during which they were exposed to novel objects and actions with novel names. The children then were asked questions about the semantic features of these novel objects and actions. Overall, the questions about actions were more difficult for children than objects. The children with SLI were able to recognize fewer semantic features than were their peers with NL. They also performed poorly relative to their peers on a lexical label recognition task. These results lend support to the idea that children with SLI have broader difficulties with receptive vocabulary than simply a reduced ability to acquire labels.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and R01-DC04726.
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