Is Voice Amplification for Teachers With Dysphonia Really Beneficial? We have read with interest the research report by Roy et al. (2002) . These authors evaluated whether public school teachers with complaints of voice difficulties perceived improvements in their voice abilities following either a program of vocal hygiene (VH) suggestions or use of a portable voice amplification device. A ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 2004
Is Voice Amplification for Teachers With Dysphonia Really Beneficial?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James Paul Dworkin
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
  • G. G. Abkarian
    Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
  • Robert J. Stachler
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
  • Richard A. Culatta
    Appalachian State University, Boone, NC
  • Robert J. Meleca
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: aa1544@Wayne.edu
  • Contact author: James Dworkin, PhD, 37000 Fox Glen, Farmington Hills, MI 48331. E-mail: aa1544@Wayne.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 2004
Is Voice Amplification for Teachers With Dysphonia Really Beneficial?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2004, Vol. 47, 353-357. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/028)
History: Received June 11, 2003 , Accepted August 25, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2004, Vol. 47, 353-357. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/028)
History: Received June 11, 2003; Accepted August 25, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2
We have read with interest the research report by Roy et al. (2002) . These authors evaluated whether public school teachers with complaints of voice difficulties perceived improvements in their voice abilities following either a program of vocal hygiene (VH) suggestions or use of a portable voice amplification device. A no-treatment control group with an equivalent history of dysphonia was also included.
In each treatment program, participants individually met with a voice clinician on four occasions to (a) obtain baseline voice data, (b) discuss the training program, (c) provide performance guidance, and (d) collect posttreatment voice data. These data consisted of audiotape recordings and self-impressions of voice abilities as measured by responses to various questionnaires, including a validated Voice Handicap Index (VHI; Jacobson et al., 1997). The scores derived from the pre- and posttreatment questionnaires were compared at the completion of the investigation. The audiotape recordings were subjected to acoustic analyses to reveal mean jitter and shimmer levels as well as noise-to-harmonic ratios (NHR) for each of the three groups of participants.
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